Contents


The Virtues of Nakedness

Baseball: The People’s Game by Harold Seymour

Men At Work: The Craft of Baseball by George F. Will

When the Cheering Stops: Former Major Leaguers Talk about Their Game and Their Lives by Lee Heiman, by Dave Weiner, by Bill Gutman

Night for Day

François Truffaut: Correspondence, 1945–1984 edited by Gilles Jacob, edited by Claude de Givray, translated by Gilbert Adair, foreword by Jean-Luc Godard

Liberators

The General in His Labyrinth by Gabriel García Márquez, translated by Edith Grossman

Collected Novellas (Leaf Storm, Nobody Writes to the Colonel, Chronicle of a Death Foretold) by Gabriel García Márquez

Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez, translated by Edith Grossman

In Praise of the Stepmother by Mario Vargas Llosa, translated by Helen Lane

The War of the End of the World by Mario Vargas Llosa, translated by Helen Lane

Contributors

Joan Acocella is a staff writer for The New Yorker. She is the author of Mark Morris, Creating Hysteria: Women and Multiple Personality Disorder, and Willa Cather and the Politics of Criticism. She also edited the recent, unexpurgated Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky. Her article in the May 23, 2013 issue is adapted from her introduction to a new edition of Isadora Duncan’s My Life, published in May 2013 by Liveright.


Robert M. Adams (1915-1996) was a founding editor of the Norton Anthology of English Literature. He taught at the University of Wisconsin, Rutgers, Cornell and U.C.L.A. His scholarly interested ranged from Milton to Joyce, and his translations of many classic works of French literature continue to be read to this day.

Julian Barnes has written eleven novels, three books of short stories, and four collections of essays. His latest novel, The Sense of an Ending, won the 2011 Man Booker Prize.

Isaiah Berlin (1909–1997) was a political philosopher and historian of ideas. Born in Riga, he moved in 1917 with his family to Petrograd, where he witnessed the Russian Revolution. In 1921 he emigrated to England. He was educated at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and became a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, where he was later appointed Professor of Social and Political Theory. He served as the first president of Wolfson College, Oxford, and as president of the British Academy. His correspondence between 1975 and 1997 will be published in 2015. The third volume of his correspondence, Building: Letters 1960–1975, was published in 2013.

Elena Bonner, the widow of Andrei Sakharov, is a longtime human rights activist and the Chair of the Andrei Sakharov Foundation in Moscow. (March 2001)

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

Jamey Gambrell is a writer on Russian art and culture. She has translated Vladimir Sorokin’s ­three-volume Ice Trilogy and his novel Day of the Oprichnik into English. Among her other translations are works by Marina ­Tsvetaeva and Tatyana Tolstaya.

Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002) was an American geologist, biologist and historian of science. He taught at Harvard, where he was named Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology, and at NYU. His last book was Punctuated Equilibrium.

Robert L. Heilbroner (1919–2005) was an American economist. He taught economic history at the New School, where he was appointed Norman Thomas Professor of Economics in 1971.

Robert Hughes (1938–2012) was an art critic and television writer. In the award-winning documentary series, The Shock of The New, Hughes recounted the development of modern art since the Impressionists; in The Fatal Shore, he explored the history of his native Australia. Hughes’s memoir, Things I Didn’t Know, was published in 2006.

Jeri Laber, Senior Advisor to Human Rights Watch, was formerly executive director of its Helsinki division. She is the author, with Barnett R. Rubin, of ‘A Nation is Dying’: Afghanistan Under the Soviets, 1979—1987. (January 1997)

Nicholas Lemann is a Professor at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and a staff writer for The New Yorker.
 He is the author of The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy and The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America, among other books.

Simon Leys (1935–2014) was the pen name of Pierre Ryckmans, who was born in Belgium and settled in Australia in 1970. He taught Chinese literature at the Australian National University and was a professor of Chinese studies at the University of Sydney from 1987 to 1993. Leys’s writing has appeared in The New York Review of Books, Le Monde, Le Figaro Littéraire, and other periodicals. Among his books are The Hall of Uselessness (NYRB Classics), Chinese Shadows, Other People’s Thoughts, and The Wreck of the Batavia & Prosper. In 1996 he delivered the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Boyer Lectures. His many awards include the Prix Renaudot, the Prix Femina, the Prix Guizot, and the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction.

Michael Scammell, the author of biographies of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Arthur Koestler, is working on a new translation of Crime and Punishment. (July 2014)