Contents


Revolt in Munich!

The Munich Secession: Art and Artists in Turn-of-the-Century Munich by Maria Makela

Diary of an Erotic Life by Frank Wedekind, translated by W.E. Yuill, edited by Gerhard Hay

The Blue Rider in the Lenbachhaus, Munich by Armin Zweite

Franz Marc by Mark Rosenthal

The Blaue Reiter Almanac edited by Wassily Kandinsky, by Franz Marc (new edition), edited with an introduction by Klaus Lankheit

Franz Marc: Postcards to Prince Jussuf by Peter-Klaus Schuster

The Mountain Hedonist

The Practice of the Wild

Riprap and Cold Mountain Poems

Myths and Texts

Turtle Island

Axe Handles

Earth House Hold

The Old Ways

He Who Hunted Birds in His Father’s Village: The Dimensions of a Haida Myth

The Real Work: Interviews and Talks edited by Scott McLean

Passage Through India

Mystery Man

The Man Who Changed The World: The Lives of Mikhail S. Gorbachev by Gail Sheehy

The New Russians by Hedrick Smith

Did It Flow?

Hourglass by Danilo Kiš, translated by Ralph Manheim

Mendelssohn Is On The Roof by Jirí Weil, translated by Marie Winn

The Miracle Game by Josef Skvorecky, translated by Paul Wilson

Native Sons

The Cocaine Kids: The Inside Story of a Teenage Drug Ring by Terry Williams

Raw Recruits by Alexander Wolff, by Armen Keteyian

The Source: The Rap Music Decade, 1980–1990 edited by Jonathan Shecter, edited by David Mays

Contributors

John Ashbery is the author of several books of poetry, including Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror (1975), which received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the National Book Award. His first collection, Some Trees (1956), was selected by W. H. Auden for the Yale Younger Poets Series. He has also published art criticism, plays, and a novel. From 1990 until 2008 Ashbery was the Charles P. Stevenson, Jr. Professor of Languages and Literature at Bard College. Ashbery’s most recent collection of poetry is Quick Question. His Collected French Translations will be published in April 2014 in two volumes, one of Prose and one of Poetry.

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Jeremy Bernstein’s books include Plutonium: A History of the World’s Most Dangerous Element and Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know. His latest book is A Palette of Particles.
 (November 2013)

David Bromwich is Sterling Professor of English at Yale. Moral Imagination, a collection of his essays, was published in March and his new book, The Intellectual Life of Edmund Burke: From the Sublime and Beautiful to American Independence, will be published in May. (April 2014)

J. H. Elliott is Regius Professor Emeritus of Modern History at the University of Oxford. He is the author of History in the Making.

Jamey Gambrell is a writer on Russian art and culture. She has translated Vladimir Sorokin’s ­three-volume Ice Trilogy and his novel Day of the Oprichnik into English. Among her other translations are works by Marina ­Tsvetaeva and Tatyana Tolstaya.

James Joll (1936–2011) was a British historian. His books include The Origins of the First World War and Europe Since 1870.

Arthur Kempton, the author of Boogaloo: The Quintessence of American Popular Music, is a fellow at the Institute for African-American Research at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (March 2006)

Bill McKibben is Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, and the author of The End of Nature, Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future, Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet and of the forthcoming Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist.. He is also the founder of 350.org, the global climate campaign that has been actively involved in the fight against natural gas fracking.

Louis Menand is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English at Harvard. His books include The Marketplace of Ideas, American Studies and The Metaphysical Club.

V. S. Naipaul was born in Trinidad in 1932 and emigrated to England in 1950, when he won a scholarship to University College, Oxford. He is the author of many novels, including A House for Mr. Biswas, A Bend in the River, and In a Free State, which won the Booker Prize. He has also written several nonfiction works based on his travels, including India: A Million Mutinies Now and Beyond Belief: Islamic Excursions Among the Converted Peoples. He was knighted in 1990 and in 1993 was the first recipient of the David Cohen British Literature Prize.

Oliver Sacks is a physician and the author of ten books, the most recent of which is Hallucinations. He is a professor of ­neurology at NYU School of Medicine and a visiting professor at the University of Warwick.


Tatyana Tolstaya was born in Leningrad in 1951 to an aristocratic family that includes the writers Leo and Alexei Tolstoy. After completing a degree in classics at Leningrad State University, Tolstaya worked for several years at a Moscow publishing house. In the mid-1980s, she began publishing short stories in literary magazines and her first story collection established her as one of the foremost writers of the Gorbachev era. She spent much of the late Eighties and Nineties living in the United States and teaching at several universities. Known for her acerbic essays on contemporary Russian life, Tolstaya has also been the co-host of the Russian cultural interview television program School for Scandal. Both her novel, The Slynx and her collection of stories, White Walls, are published by NYRB Classics.