Contents


Uncle Whiz

The Table Talk of W.H. Auden by Alan Ansen, edited by Nicholas Jenkins, Introduction by Richard Howard

Memoirs of a Bastard Angel by Harold Norse

W.H. Auden: ‘The Map of All My Youth,’ Early Works, Friends and Influences Auden Studies, Volume I edited by Katherine Bucknell, edited by Nicholas Jenkins

Auden’s Apologies For Poetry by Lucy McDiarmid

Supreme Suprematist

Kazimir Malevich, 1878–1935 September–November, 1990; The Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center, Los Angeles, November 28, 1900–January 13, 1991; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, February 7, 1991–March 24, 1991 an exhibition at The National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC,

Kazimir Malevich, 1878–1935 catalog of the exhibition, edited by Jeanne D'Andrea

Revising the Revolution

The Blessed Revolution: English Politics and the Coming of War, 1621–1624 by Thomas Cogswell

Charles I and the Road to Personal Rule by L.J. Reeve

Puritans and Roundheads: The Harleys of Brampton Bryan and the Outbreak of the English Civil War by Jacqueline Eales

Conflict in Early Stuart England: Studies in Religion and Politics, 1603–1642 edited by Richard Cust, edited by Ann Hughes

Contributors

Noel Annan (1916–2000) was a British military intelligence officer and scholar of European history. His works include Leslie Stephen and Our Age, Changing Enemies: The Defeat and Regeneration of Germany, and The Curious Strength of Positivism in English Political Thought.

Robert Craft is a conductor and writer. Craft’s close working friendship with Igor Stravinsky is the subject of his memoir, An Improbable Life. In 2002 he was awarded the International Prix du Disque at the Cannes Music Festival.

Joan Didion is the author of The Year of Magical Thinking and We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live: Collected Nonfiction.

James Fallows is National Correspondent for The Atlantic.His books include Free Flight: Inventing the Future of Travel, Blind into Baghdad: America’s War in Iraq, and China Airborne.

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He has just published, with Edward Mortimer and Kerem Öktem, Freedom in Diversity: Ten Lessons for Public Policy from Britain, Canada, France, Germany and the United States.


John Golding (1929–2012) was a British painter and art historian. He taught at the Courtauld Institute and the Royal College of Art. Among his many books was Cubism: A History and an Analysis, which refuted the notion that Cubism represented a break with the realist tradition. Golding also curated exhibitions on both sides of the Atlantic, including Picasso: Painter/Sculpter and Matisse Picasso.

Simon Head is an Associate Fellow at the Rothermere American Institute at Oxford and a Scholar at the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University. His most recent book is The New Ruthless Economy: Work and Power in the Digital Age. (January 2011)

Stanley Hoffmann is Paul and Catherine Buttenwieser University Professor at Harvard. His most recent books are Chaos and Violence: What Globalization, Failed States, and Terrorism Mean for US Foreign Policy and Rousseau and Freedom, coedited with Christie McDonald.


Robert Towers (1923–1995) was an American critic and novelist. Born in Virginia, Towers was educated at Princeton and served for two years as Vice Counsel at the American Consulate General in Calcutta before dedicating himself to literary studies. He taught English literature and creative writing at Princeton, Queens College and Columbia.

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. His new book, Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare’s Time, will be published in the summer 2014.

Blair Worden is Hugh Trevor-Roper’s literary executor. His most recent book is God’s Instruments: Political Conduct in the England of Oliver Cromwell. (January 2014)

Lord Zuckerman (1904–1993) was a British zoologist and military strategist. Having advised the Allies on bombing strategy during World War II, he spent much of his later life campaigning for nuclear non-proliferation. Zuckerman was knighted in 1956 and made a life peer in 1971.