Contents


Hard Times

The Diaries of Hans Christian Andersen selected and translated by Patricia L. Conroy, by Sven H. Rossel

The Kiss of the Snow Queen: Hans Christian Andersen and Man’s Redemption by Woman by Wolfgang Lederer

The Triumph of Abram Tertz

Goodnight! A Novel by Abram Tertz (Andrei Sinyavsky), translated and with an introduction by Richard Lourie

Soviet Civilization: A Cultural History by Andrei Sinyavsky, translated by Joanne Turnbull, with the assistance of Nikolai Formozov

Opavshie Listya’ V.V. Rozanova by Andrei Sinyavsky

Ivan le Simple: Paganisme, magie et religion du peuple russe by André Siniavski, translated by Antonina Robichou-Stretz

Dans I’ombre de Gogol by Abram Tertz (André Siniavski), translated by Georges Nivat

Promenades avec Pouchkine by Abram Tertz (André Siniavski), translated by Louis Martinez

Andre-la-Poisse (Kroshka Tsores) by Abram Tertz (André Siniavski), translated by Louis Martinez

Contributors

Janet Adam Smith (1905–1999) was a Scottish writer and critic. Educated at Oxford, she worked as an editor at a number of literary publications, including The Listener, The Criterion and New Statesman. She also edited the Faber Book of Modern Verse and its companion volume, the Faber Book of Children’s Verse. An accomplished mountaineer, Smith wrote about her adventures in Mountain Holidays; her other books include Life Among the Scots and John Buchnan and His World.

Jeremy Bernstein’s books include Plutonium: A History of the World’s Most Dangerous Element and Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know. His latest book is A Palette of Particles.
 (November 2013)

Hans A. Bethe is Professor Emeritus of Physics at Cornell University. During the construction of the first atomic bomb he was head of the Theoretical Physics Division at Los Alamos and he has worked on arms control for the last forty years. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1967. (November 2000)

Abraham Brumberg (1926–2008) was an essayist, editor and translator. His memoir, Journey Through Vanishing Worlds, was published by New Academia in 2007.

Anita Desai is the author, most recently, of The Artist of Disappearance, a collection of three novellas.(September 2013)

Joseph Frank is Professor Emeritus of Slavic and Comparative Literature at Stanford. He is the author of Dostoyevsky: The Mantle of the Prophet, 1871–1881. (June 2008)

Richard Holmes is the author of Shelley: The Pursuit (published by NYRB Classics), which won the Somerset Maugham Award in 1974; Coleridge: Early Visions, winner of the 1989 Whitbread Book of the Year award; Dr Johnson & Mr Savage, which won the 1993 James Tait Black Prize; and Coleridge: Darker Reflections, which won the 1990 Duff Cooper Prize and Heinemann Award. His new book, Falling Upwards: How We Took to the Air, was published in October 2013. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and was awarded the Order of the British Empire in 1992. He is also a professor of biographical studies at the University of East Anglia. He lives in London and Norwich with the novelist Rose Tremain.

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Nicholas Lemann is Dean and Henry R. Luce Professor at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism.
 He is the author of The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy and The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America, among other books.

Avishai Margalit is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is the winner of the 2012 Philosophical Book Award (Hanover) for his most recent book, On Compromise and Rotten Compromises. He is currently Edwin Heafey Jr. Visiting Professor at Stanford.


Michael Massing, a contributing editor of the Columbia Journalism Review, writes frequently on the press and foreign affairs.

Thomas Powers is the author of The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA (1979), Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the German Bomb (1993), Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda (2002; revised and expanded edition, 2004), and The Confirmation (2000), a novel. He won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1971 and has contributed to The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Nation, The Atlantic, and Rolling Stone. His latest book, The Killing of Crazy Horse, won the 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. He is currently writing a memoir of his father, who once told him that the last time he met Clare Boothe Luce was in the office of Allen Dulles.


Robert Towers (1923–1995) was an American critic and novelist. Born in Virginia, Towers was educated at Princeton and served for two years as Vice Counsel at the American Consulate General in Calcutta before dedicating himself to literary studies. He taught English literature and creative writing at Princeton, Queens College and Columbia.

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown. His latest book is The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States.