Wind from the Prairie

Carl Sandburg: A Biography by Penelope Niven

Vachel Lindsay: A Poet in America by Edgar Lee Masters

Lincoln: The Man by Edgar Lee Masters

The West-Going Heart: A Life of Vachel Lindsay by Eleanor Ruggles

The Art of the Moving Picture by Nicholas Vachel Lindsay, Introduction by Stanley Kauffmann

Samurai of Swat

Slugging It Out in Japan: An American Major Leaguer in the Tokyo Outfield by Warren Cromartie, with Robert Whiting


Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Shaul Bakhash is Robinson Professor of History at George Mason University and the author of The Reign of the Ayatollahs: Iran and the Islamic Revolution. (September 2005)

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of many novels, including The Book of Evidence, The Untouchable, Eclipse, The Sea (winner of the Man Booker Prize), and Ancient Light. His latest novel ­The Blue Guitar was published in September 2015. As Benjamin Black he has written six crime novels, including Vengeance.

Jeremy Bernstein’s books include Plutonium: A History of the World’s Most Dangerous Element , Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know and A Palette of Particles.
 His latest book is Nuclear Iran (October, 2014).

Ian Buruma is the author of The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013), and Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the Shadows of War (2014), winner of the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book, Their ­Promised Land: My Grandparents in Love and War, will be published in January 2016.

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

George M. Fredrickson is Edgar E. Robinson Professor of US History Emeritus at Stanford. His recent books include Racism: A Short History and Not Just Black and White, a collection co-edited with Nancy Foner.

Jamey Gambrell is a writer on Russian art and culture. She has translated Vladimir Sorokin’s ­three-volume Ice Trilogy and his novel Day of the Oprichnik into English. Among her other translations are works by Marina ­Tsvetaeva and Tatyana Tolstaya.

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916-2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.

Roderick Macfarquhar is Leroy B. Williams Research Professor of History and Political Science at Harvard. His latest publication as editor and contributor is The Politics of China: Sixty Years of the People’s Republic of China.
 (August 2015)

Norman Mailer (1923-2007) was born in Long Branch, New Jersey, and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. In 1955 he co-founded The Village Voice. He is the author of more than thirty books, including The Naked and the Dead; The Armies of the Night, for which he won a National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize; The Executioner’s Song, for which he won his second Pulitzer Prize; Harlot’s Ghost; Oswald’s Tale; The Gospel According to the Son; and The Castle in the Forest.

Martin Malia is Professor of History Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author, most recently, of Russia Under Western Eyes, from the Bronze Horseman to the Lenin Mausoleum. (November 2001)

Ronald Steel is Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern California, a recent fellow at the American Academy in Berlin, and the author of biographies of Walter Lippmann and Robert Kennedy.

C. Vann Woodward (1908–1999) was a historian of the American South. He taught at Johns Hopkins and at Yale, where he was named the Sterling Professor of History. His books include Mary Chesnut’s Civil War and The Old World’s New World.