Contents


The Ways of Survival

Jakob Littners Aufzeichnungen aus einem Erdloch by Wolfgang Koeppen

A Feast in the Garden by George Konrád, translated by Imre Goldstein

The American Dilemma

Two Nations: Black and White, Separate, Hostile, Unequal by Andrew Hacker

The Dispossessed: America’s Underclasses from the Civil War to the Present by Jacqueline Jones

The Possessed

Crackhouse: Notes from the End of the Line by Terry Williams

Clockers by Richard Price

Splendor and Miseries

Women for Hire: Prostitution and Sexuality in France after 1850 by Alain Corbin, translated by Alan Sheridan

La Vie quotidienne dans les maisons closes, 1830–1930 by Laure Adler

Figures of Ill Repute: Representing Prostitution in Nineteenth-Century France by Charles Bernheimer

Painted Love: Prostitution in French Art of the Impressionist Era by Hollis Clayson

Austere Fireworks

Collected Poems: A Bilingual Edition by Federico García Lorca, edited by Christopher Maurer

Four Puppet Plays, ‘Play Without a Title,’ The Divan Poems and Other Poems, Prose Poems and Dramatic Pieces by Federico García Lorca, translated by Edwin Honig

Line of Light and Shadow: The Drawings of Federico García Lorca by Mario Hernández, translated by Christopher Maurer

The House of Bernarda Alba a film directed by Nuria Espert and Stuart Burge, produced by Holmes for Channel 4

The Genius of Cento

Guercino: Master Painter of the Baroque 15–May 17, 1992 an exhibition at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, March

Guercino: Master Painter of the Baroque catalog of the exhibition by Denis Mahon, with contributions by Andrea Emiliani and Diane De Grazia and Sybille Ebert-Schifferer

Guercino: Drawings from Windsor Castle an exhibition at The Drawing Center, New York, June 2–August 1, 1992

Guercino: Drawings from Windsor Castle catalog of the exhibition and Nicholas Turner

Guercino: Master Draftsman, Works from North American Collections catalog by David M. Stone

Guercino (1591–1661): Drawings From Dutch Collections catalog by Carel van Tuyll Van Serooskerken

Contributors

Robert M. Adams (1915-1996) was a founding editor of the Norton Anthology of English Literature. He taught at the University of Wisconsin, Rutgers, Cornell and U.C.L.A. His scholarly interested ranged from Milton to Joyce, and his translations of many classic works of French literature continue to be read to this day.

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (October 2017)

James McPherson is George Henry Davis ’86 Professor of American History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1989, and, most ­recently, The War That Forged a Nation: Why the Civil War Still Matters.
 (October 2016)

David Remnick is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Lenin’s Tomb, The Devil Problem and Other True Stories, and Resurrection. He is the editor of The New Yorker.

John Richardson’s four-volume Life of Picasso is due to be finished this year. (May 2016)

Luc Sante teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard. His latest book is The Other Paris. (October 2017)

Michael Wood is Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. He is the author of Hitchcock: The Man Who Knew Too Much and America in the Movies, among other books.
 (May 2017)

C. Vann Woodward (1908–1999) was a historian of the American South. He taught at Johns Hopkins and at Yale, where he was named the Sterling Professor of History. His books include Mary Chesnut’s Civil War and The Old World’s New World.

Francine du Plessix Gray received the National Book Critics Circle Award in 2006 for her memoir Them: A Memoir of Parents.