Contents


The Morning After

The Seven Fat Years: And How To Do It Again by Robert L. Bartley

The Bankrupting of America: How the Federal Budget Is Impoverishing the Nation by David P. Calleo

A Self-Made Man

Driven Patriot: The Life and Times of James Forrestal by Townsend Hoopes, by Douglas Brinkley

Eberstadt and Forrestal: A National Security Partnership, 1909–1949 by Jeffrey M. Dorwart

A Preponderance of Power: National Security, the Truman Administration, and the Cold War by Melvyn P. Leffler

Tireless Messenger

Provinces: Poems 1987––1991 by Czeslaw Milosz. Translated by the author and Robert Hass

Beginning With My Streets: Essays and Recollections by Czeslaw Milosz, translated by Madeline G. Levine

The Poet’s Work: An Introduction to Czeslaw Milosz by Leonard Nathan, by Arthur Quinn

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

John Ashbery is the author of several books of poetry, including Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror (1975), which received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the National Book Award. His first collection, Some Trees (1956), was selected by W. H. Auden for the Yale Younger Poets Series. He has also published art criticism, plays, and a novel. From 1990 until 2008 Ashbery was the Charles P. Stevenson, Jr. Professor of Languages and Literature at Bard College. Ashbery’s new collection of poems, Breezeway, will be ­published in May 2015.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of many novels, including The Book of Evidence, The Untouchable, Eclipse, The Sea (winner of the Man Booker Prize), and Ancient Light. His latest novel ­The Blue Guitar was published in September 2015. As Benjamin Black he has written six crime novels, including Vengeance.

Jeremy Bernstein’s books include Plutonium: A History of the World’s Most Dangerous Element , Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know and A Palette of Particles.
 His latest book is Nuclear Iran (October, 2014).

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Thomas R. Edwards (1928–2005) was Professor of English at Rutgers and editor of Raritan. His last book was Over Here: Criticizing America.

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier ­Professor of Political Economy at Harvard. His books include The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth and Day of Reckoning: The Consequences of American Economic Policy Under Reagan and After.
 (October 2014)

Misha Glenny is the author of The Balkans: Nationalism, War, and the Great Powers, 1804–1999. (July 2003)

Stuart Hampshire (1914–2004) was an English philosopher. He taught at University College London, Princeton, Stanford and Oxford, where he was named Warden of Wadham College. His books include Thought and Action, Spinoza and Justice Is Conflict.

Roger Shattuck (1923–2005) was an American writer and scholar of French culture. He taught at Harvard, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Virginia, and Boston University, where he was named University Professor. His books includeForbidden Knowledge: From Prometheus to Pornography.

Ronald Steel is Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern California, a recent fellow at the American Academy in Berlin, and the author of biographies of Walter Lippmann and Robert Kennedy.

Helen Vendler is the Arthur Kingsley Porter 
University Professor in the Department of English at Harvard. The Ocean, the Bird, and the Scholar, a collection of her later essays, has just been published.
 (June 2015)

Garry Wills holds the Alonzo L. McDonald Family Chair on the Life and Teachings of Jesus and Their Impact on Culture at Emory. He is the author of The Future of the Catholic Church with Pope Francis.

Paul Wilson is a writer based in Toronto. He has translated major works by Josef Škvorecký, Ivan Klíma, Bohumil Hrabal, and Václav Havel. His translation of a collection of Hrabal’s early stories will be published in October as Mr. Kafka and Other Tales from the Time of the Cult. (April 2015)