Contents


Invasion of the Mind Snatchers

Politics by Other Means: Higher Education and Group Thinking by David Bromwich

Beyond the Culture Wars: How Teaching the Conflicts Can Revitalize American Education by Gerald Graff

Community of Learning: The American College and the Liberal Arts Tradition by Francis Oakley

He’s the Top

The Paintings and Sketches of Louis I. Kahn by Jan Hochstim, Introduction by Vincent Scully

Louis I. Kahn: Writings, Lectures, Interviews edited and with an introduction by Alessandra Latour

Louis I. Kahn: In the Realm of Architecture 1991–January 5, 1992), Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (March 5–May 4, 1992), the Museum of Modern Art, New York (June 14–August 18, 1992), the Museum of Modern Art, Gunma, Japan (September 26–November 3, 1992), an exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Louis I. Kahn: In the Realm of Architecture catalog of the exhibition by David B. Brownlee, by David G. De Long

The Art Museums of Louis I. Kahn University Museum of Art by catalog of an exhibition at the Duke Patricia Cummings Loud, foreword by Michael P. Mezzatesta

Nietzsche vs. Nietzsche

The Nietzsche Legacy in Germany, 1890–1990 by Steven E. Aschheim

Forgotten Fatherland: The Search for Elisabeth Nietzsche by Ben Macintyre

When Nietzsche Wept by Irvin D. Yalom

Popes and Pagans

Rome Reborn: The Vatican Library and Renaissance Culture DC, January 6–April 30, 1993 catalog of the exhibition at the Library of Congress, Washington,, edited by Anthony Grafton

From Byzantium to Italy: Greek Studies in the Italian Renaissance by N.G. Wilson

Piero della Francesca by Carlo Bertelli, translated by Edward Farrelly

Contributors

Stanisław Barańczak is a poet, translator, and literary critic. He won the 2007 Nike Award for the best work of Polish literature published in the previous year and the 2009 Silesius Poetry Award for lifetime achievement. He is a professor of Polish language and literature at Harvard University.

Péter Esterházy was born in Budapest in 1950. He is one of Hungary’s most prominent writers, and his short stories, novels, and essays have been published in more than twenty languages.

Martin Filler’s latest book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II, has been long-listed for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Filler was born in 1948 and received degrees in art history from Columbia University. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and his writing on modern architecture has been published in more than thirty journals, magazines, and newspapers in the US, Europe, and Japan. His first collection of New York Review essays, Makers of Modern Architecture, was published in 2007. Filler is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife, the architectural historian Rosemarie Haag Bletter, live in New York and Southampton.

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He has just published, with Edward Mortimer and Kerem Öktem, Freedom in Diversity: Ten Lessons for Public Policy from Britain, Canada, France, Germany and the United States.


Stanley Hoffmann is Paul and Catherine Buttenwieser University Professor at Harvard. His most recent books are Chaos and Violence: What Globalization, Failed States, and Terrorism Mean for US Foreign Policy and Rousseau and Freedom, coedited with Christie McDonald.


Irving Howe (1920–1993) was an American literary and social critic. His history of Eastern-European Jews in America, World of Our Fathers, won the 1977 National Book Award in History.

James Joll (1936–2011) was a British historian. His books include The Origins of the First World War and Europe Since 1870.

Ira Katznelson is Ruggles Professor of Political Science and ­History at Columbia and President of the Social Science Research Council. His latest book is Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time. (April 2014)

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Paul Kennedy, the J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History and Director of International Security Studies at Yale, is the author and editor of fifteen books, including The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers. His latest book is The Parliament of Man: The Past, Present, and Future of the United Nations. (November 2006)

Jamaica Kincaid was born in St. John’s, Antigua, and has lived in the United States since she was sixteen. She is the author of several books of fiction and nonfiction, including At the Bottom of the River, A Small Place, Annie John, Mr. Potter, My Brother, Among Flowers: A Walk in the Himalayas, and most recently, the novel See Now Then.

Janos Kis, who teaches philosophy at Central European University in Budapest, was a leading member of the Hungarian democratic opposition to the Communist regime and co-founder and first chairman of Hungary’s liberal party. His latest book is Politics as a Moral Problem, which will be published in November. (July 2008)

Adam Michnik is Editor in Chief of the Warsaw daily newspaper Gazeta Wyborcza. His newest book is The Trouble With History: Morality, Revolution, and Counterrevolution.

Arthur Miller (1915–2005) was an American playwright and essayist. His 1949 play, Death of A Salesman, received a Tony Award for Best Author, The New York Drama Circle Critics’ Award, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

Alan Ryan’s collected essays The Making of Modern Liberalism and his two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought were published last year.

Simon Schama‘s most recent book is A History of Britain, Volume II: The Wars of the British, 1603–1776, the companion volume to his ongoing BBC/History Channel television series. (February 2002)

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. (1917–2007) was an American historian and social critic. He served as adviser to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson. His Journals: 1952– 2000 were published in 2007.

John Weightman (1915–2004) was a critic and literary scholar. After working as a translator and announcer for the BBC French service, Weightman turned to the study of French literature. He taught at King’s College London and the University of London. His books include The Concept of the Avant-Gardeand The Cat Sat on the Mat: Language and the Absurd.

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. His new book, Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare’s Time, will be published in the summer 2014.