Contents


Who Can Police the World?

Cooperating for Peace: The Global Agenda for the 1990s and Beyond by Gareth Evans

Seeking Peace from Chaos: Humanitarian Intervention in Somalia Publishers by Samuel M. Makinda

The UN in Cambodia: Lessons for Complex Peacekeeping International Peacekeeping by Michael W. Doyle and Nishkala Suntharalingam

Aftermath of the Gulf War: An Assessment of UN Action Publishers by Ian Johnstone

Housing the Homeless

Over the Edge: The Growth of Homelessness in the 1980s by Martha R. Burt

A Place to Call Home: The Low Income Housing Crisis Continues Information Service by Edward Lazere and Paul Leonard and Cushing Dolbeare and Barry Zigas

Tell Them Who I Am: The Lives of Homeless Women by Elliot Liebow

The Way Home: A New Direction in Social Policy by the New York City Commission on the Homeless (Andrew Cuomo, chair)

Down and Out in America: The Origins of Homelessness by Peter H. Rossi

New Homeless and Old: Community and the Skid Row Hotel by Charles Hoch and Robert Slayton

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (October 2017)

Richard Holmes’s books include Shelley, Footsteps, Coleridge, The Age of Wonder, and, most recently, This Long Pursuit. 
 (December 2017)

Christopher Jencks is the Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy at Harvard. He is the author of Rethinking Social Policy and The Homeless, among other books. (June 2016)

Louis Menand is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English at Harvard. His books include The Marketplace of Ideas, American Studies and The Metaphysical Club.

Thomas Nagel is University Professor Emeritus at NYU. He is the author of The View from Nowhere, Mortal Questions, and Mind and ­Cosmos, among other books. (September 2017)

V. S. Naipaul was born in Trinidad in 1932 and emigrated to England in 1950, when he won a scholarship to University College, Oxford. He is the author of many novels, including A House for Mr. Biswas, A Bend in the River, and In a Free State, which won the Booker Prize. He has also written several nonfiction works based on his travels, including India: A Million Mutinies Now and Beyond Belief: Islamic Excursions Among the Converted Peoples. He was knighted in 1990 and in 1993 was the first recipient of the David Cohen British Literature Prize.

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life.

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festschrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. His most recent book is What the Qur’an Meant: And Why It Matters. (December 2017)