Contents


Singing in the Rain

Strange Pilgrims: Twelve Stories by Gabriel García Márquez, translated by Edith Grossman

Gabriel García Márquez: Solitude and Solidarity by Michael Bell

Oliver Stone’s USA

Heaven and Earth a film directed by Oliver Stone, produced by Arnon Milchan, by Robert Kline, by A. Kitman Ho, by Oliver Stone

Dutch Treat

Judith Leyster: A Dutch Master and Her World Netherlands, May 16–August 22, 1993, and Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts, September 19–December 5, 1993. by James A. Welu, by Pieter Biesboer et al.. catalog of an exhibition held at the Frans Halsmuseum, Haarlem, The

The Crime of Punishment

Crime Control as Industry: Towards GULAGS, Western Style? by Nils Christie

Prison Conditions in the United States a Human Rights Watch report

Between Prison and Probation: Intermediate Punishments in a Rational Sentencing System by Norval Morris, by Michael Tonry

A Decade of Sentencing Guidelines: Revisiting the Role of the Legislature Wake Forest Law Review Summer 1993 issue

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Joseph Brodsky (1940–1996) was a Russian poet and essayist. Born in Leningrad, Brodsky moved to the United States when he was exiled from Russia in 1972. His poetry collections include A Part of Speech andTo Urania; his essay collections include Less Than One, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Watermark. In 1987, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. He served as US Poet Laureate from 1991 to 1992.

R. J. W. Evans is a Fellow of Oriel College and Regius Professor of History Emeritus at Oxford. His books include Austria, Hungary, and the Habsburgs: Central Europe, c. 1683–1867. (February 2014)

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier ­Professor of Political Economy at Harvard. His books include The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth and Day of Reckoning: The Consequences of American Economic Policy Under Reagan and After.
 (October 2014)

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916-2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.

Václav Havel (1936–2011) was the last president of Czechoslovakia and the first president of the Czech Republic. Havel was one of the six signers of the statement “Tibet: The Peace of the Graveyard.”

Avishai Margalit is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is the winner of the 2012 Ernst Bloch Prize in philosophy.


Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

David J. Rothman is Bernard Schoenberg Professor of Social Medicine and History at the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons and president of the Institute on Medicine as a Professor.

Robert Stone was born in Brooklyn in 1937. He is the author of seven novels: A Hall of Mirrors, the National Book Award–winning Dog Soldiers, A Flag for Sunrise, Children of Light, Outerbridge Reach, Damascus Gate, and Bay of Souls. He has also written short stories, essays, and screenplays, and published a short story collection, Bear and His Daughter, which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. He lives in New York City and in Key West, Florida.

Paul Wilson is a writer based in Toronto. He has translated major works by Josef Škvorecký, Ivan Klíma, Bohumil Hrabal, and Václav Havel into English.
 (April 2014)