Contents


Beyond the Picturesque

American Impressionism and Realism: The Painting of Modern Life, 1885–1915 10–July 24, 1994 an exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, May

American Impressionism and Realism: Drawings, Prints, and Photographs 3–July 24, 1994 an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, May

American Impressionism and Realism: The Painting of Modern Life, 1885–1915 catalog of the exhibition by H. Barbara Weinberg et al.

Remembrance of Ming’s Past

The Plum in the Golden Vase: or, Chin P’ing Mei Vol. I, The Gathering by an unknown author, translated by David Tod Roy

Xunzi: A Translation and Study of the Complete Works by John Knoblock

Radicals

The Birth of Fascist Ideology: From Cultural Rebellion to Political Revolution by Zeev Sternhell, with Mario Sznajder, and Maia Asheri, translated by David Maisel

Music à la Mode

Beethoven: Studies in the Creative Process by Lewis Lockwood

Haydn and the Classical Variation by Elaine R. Sisman

Haydn’s ‘Farewell’ Symphony and the Idea of the Classical Style by James Webster

Feminine Endings: Music, Gender and Sexuality by Susan McClary

Music and Society: The Politics of Composition, Performance, and Reception edited by Richard Leppert and Susan McClary

Musicology and Difference: Gender and Sexuality in Music Scholarship edited by Ruth A. Solie

Queering the Pitch: The New Gay and Lesbian Musicology edited by Philip Brett, Elizabeth Wood, and Gary C. Thomas

Contributors

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He currently leads the Free Speech Debate project at Oxford (freespeechdebate.com) and is writing a book about free speech.


Ernst Gombrich (1909–2001) was an Austrian art historian. Born in Vienna, Gombrich studied at the Theresianum and then at the University of Vienna under Julius von Schlosser. After graduating, he worked as a Research Assistant and collaborator with the museum curator and Freudian analyst Ernst Kris. He joined the Warburg Institute in London as a Research Assistant in 1936 and was named Director in 1959. His major works include The Story of Art, Art and Illusion: A Study in the Psychology of Pictorial Representation, Aby Warburg: An Intellectual Biography, The Sense of Order: A Study in the Psychology of Decorative Art.

George F. Kennan (1904–2005) was an American diplomat, political scientist and historian. He is best known for his role in shaping US foreign policy during the Cold War and, in particular, for the doctrine of containment. Kennan was Professor Emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton and served as Ambassador to the USSR in 1952 and as Ambassador to Yugoslavia from 1961 to 1963. His books include At a Century’s Ending and An American Family.

Jeri Laber, Senior Advisor to Human Rights Watch, was formerly executive director of its Helsinki division. She is the author, with Barnett R. Rubin, of ‘A Nation is Dying’: Afghanistan Under the Soviets, 1979—1987. (January 1997)

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Robert O. Paxton is Mellon Professor of Social Sciences Emeritus at Columbia. His books include Vichy France: Old Guard and New Order, 1940–1944 and, with Michael R. Marrus, Vichy France and the Jews.


Alastair Reid (1926 -2014) was a poet, prose chronicler, translator, and traveler. Born in Scotland, he came to the United States in the early 1950s, began publishing his poems in The New Yorker in 1951, and for the next fifty-odd years was a traveling correspondent for that magazine. Having lived in both Spain and Latin America for long spells, he was a constant translator of poetry from the Spanish language, in particular the work of Jorge Luis Borges and Pablo Neruda. He published more than forty books, among them two word books for children, Ounce Dice Trice, with drawings by Ben Shahn, and Supposing…, with drawings by Bob Gill, both available from The New York Review Children’s Collection.

Charles Rosen is a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Luc Sante is the author of Low Life, Evidence, The Factory of Facts, Kill All Your Darlings, and Folk Photography. He has translated Félix Fénéon’s Novels in Three Lines and written the introduction to George Simenon’s The Man Who Watched Trains Go By (both available as NYRB Classics). He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard College.

Jonathan Spence is Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. Among his books are The Death of Woman Wang, Treason by the Book, The Question of Hu, and The Search for Modern China.

Tatyana Tolstaya was born in Leningrad in 1951 to an aristocratic family that includes the writers Leo and Alexei Tolstoy. After completing a degree in classics at Leningrad State University, Tolstaya worked for several years at a Moscow publishing house. In the mid-1980s, she began publishing short stories in literary magazines and her first story collection established her as one of the foremost writers of the Gorbachev era. She spent much of the late Eighties and Nineties living in the United States and teaching at several universities. Known for her acerbic essays on contemporary Russian life, Tolstaya has also been the co-host of the Russian cultural interview television program School for Scandal. Both her novel, The Slynx and her collection of stories, White Walls, are published by NYRB Classics.

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit: Angstrom, he two of which, Rabbit is Richand Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.