Contents


So Near and Yet So Far

The Neandertals: Changing the Image of Mankind by Erik Trinkaus, by Pat Shipman

In Search of the Neanderthals: Solving the Puzzle of Human Origins by Christopher Stringer, by Clive Gamble

Going Baroque

The New World of the Gothic Fox: Culture and Economy in English and Spanish America by Claudio Véliz

Action Anglaise

Mrs. Thatcher’s Minister: The Private Diaries of Alan Clark by Alan Clark

The Faber Book of Conservatism edited by Kenneth Baker

Contributors

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book is a ­collection of essays from these pages, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the ­Shadows of War. His Year Zero: A History of 1945 is now out in paperback.


Thomas R. Edwards (1928–2005) was Professor of English at Rutgers and editor of Raritan. His last book was Over Here: Criticizing America.

J. H. Elliott is Regius Professor Emeritus of Modern History at Oxford. His most recent book is History in the Making.

William Finnegan’s books include A Complicated War: The Harrowing of Mozambique and Cold New World: Growing Up in a Harder Country. (April 2007)

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier ­Professor of Political Economy at Harvard. His books include The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth and Day of Reckoning: The Consequences of American Economic Policy Under Reagan and After.
 (October 2014)

Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002) was an American geologist, biologist and historian of science. He taught at Harvard, where he was named Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology, and at NYU. His last book was Punctuated Equilibrium.

Anthony Grafton is Henry Putnam University Professor of History and the Humanities at Princeton University. His most recent book is The Culture of Correction in Renaissance Europe.


Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Martha Nussbaum is Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago, with appointments in the Philosophy Department, the Law School, and the Divinity School. Her most recent book is Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. (January 2001)

Helen Vendler is the Arthur Kingsley Porter 
University Professor in the Department of English at Harvard. The Ocean, the Bird, and the Scholar, a collection of her later essays, has just been published.
 (June 2015)

Paul Wilson is a writer based in Toronto. He has translated major works by Josef Škvorecký, Ivan Klíma, Bohumil Hrabal, and Václav Havel. His translation of a collection of Hrabal’s early stories will be published in October as Mr. Kafka and Other Tales from the Time of the Cult. (April 2015)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown. His latest book is The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States.

C. Vann Woodward (1908–1999) was a historian of the American South. He taught at Johns Hopkins and at Yale, where he was named the Sterling Professor of History. His books include Mary Chesnut’s Civil War and The Old World’s New World.