Contents


Love on the Hudson

Closest Companion: The Unknown Story of the Intimate Friendship Between Franklin Roosevelt and Margaret Suckley edited and annotated by Geoffrey C. Ward

Stumbles and Mumbles

Brando: Songs My Mother Taught Me by Marlon Brando, by Robert Lindsey

Brando: The Biography by Peter Manso

Don Juan DeMarco a film written and directed by Jeremy Leven

Adders and Other Reptiles

Reptile Journalism: The Official Polish-Language Press under the Nazis, 1939–1945 by Lucjan Dobroszycki, translated by Barbara Harshav

Jews in the Polish Underground Press, 1939–1945’ in Poland by Lucjan Dobroszycki

Biedni Polacy Patrza Na Getto by Jan Blonski

Aristocrats

Daughters: On Family and Fatherhood by Gerald Early

Fatheralong: A Meditation on Fathers and Sons, Race and Society by John Edgar Wideman

Colored People: A Memoir by Henry Louis Gates Jr.

The Philadelphia Negro: A Social Study by W. E. B. Du Bois

No Day of Triumph by J. Saunders Redding

The Big Sea by Langston Hughes

Dust Tracks on a Road in Folklore, Memoirs, and Other Writing by Zora Neale Hurston

The Negro Family: A Study of Family Origins Before the Civil War by E. Franklin Frazier

Black Bourgeoisie: The Rise of a New Middle Class in the United States by E. Franklin Frazier

Coming Up Down Home: A Memoir of a Southern Childhood by Cecil Brown

Pushed Back to Strength: A Black Woman’s Journey Home by Gloria Wade-Gayles

Contributors

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

Andrew Hacker teaches political science at Queens College. He is currently working on a book on mathematics. 
 (January 2014)

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Norman Mailer (1923-2007) was born in Long Branch, New Jersey, and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. In 1955 he co-founded The Village Voice. He is the author of more than thirty books, including The Naked and the Dead; The Armies of the Night, for which he won a National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize; The Executioner’s Song, for which he won his second Pulitzer Prize; Harlot’s Ghost; Oswald’s Tale; The Gospel According to the Son; and The Castle in the Forest.

James Merrill (1926–1995) was an American poet whose major work The Changing Light at Sandover describes a series of spirit communications conducted over many years. He won the National Book Award from his collections Nights and Days and Mirabell: Books of Number.

Czesław Miłosz (1911–2004) was born in Szetejnie, Lithuania. Over the course of his long and prolific career he published works in many genres, including criticism (The Captive Mind), fiction (The Issa Valley), memoir (Native Realm), and poetry (New and Collected Poems, 1931-2001). He was a member of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1980.

Darryl Pinckney, a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author of a novel, High Cotton, and Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature. He lives in New York City.

Ingrid D. Rowland is a professor, based in Rome, at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. A frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, she is the author of The Culture of the High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome and The Scarith of Scornello: A Tale of Renaissance Forgery. She has also published a translation of Vitruvius’ Ten Books of Architecture and a history of Villa Taverna, the US ambassador’s residence in Rome. Her new book, From Pompeii: The Afterlife of a Roman Town, will be published in spring 2014.


Alan Ryan’s collected essays The Making of Modern Liberalism and his two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought were published last year.

Luc Sante is the author of Low Life, Evidence, The Factory of Facts, Kill All Your Darlings, and Folk Photography. He has translated Félix Fénéon’s Novels in Three Lines and written the introduction to George Simenon’s The Man Who Watched Trains Go By (both available as NYRB Classics). He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard College.

Helen Vendler is the Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor in the Department of English at Harvard. Stone at Delphi: Seamus Heaney’s Poems with Classical References, Selected and Introduced by Helen Vendler appeared earlier this year in a limited edition.
 (November 2013)

Gore Vidal (1925–2012) was an American novelist, essayist, and playwright. His many works include the memoirs Point to Point Navigation and Palimpsest, the novels The City and the Pillar, Myra Breckinridge, and Lincoln, and the collection United States: Essays 1952–1992.

Michael Wood is the Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. His books include Literature and the Taste of Knowledge and Yeats and Violence