Supreme Outsider

James McNeill Whistler 28-August 20, 1995 an exhibition at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, May

James McNeill Whistler by Richard Dorment and Margaret F. MacDonald

James McNeill Whistler: Beyond the Myth by Ronald Anderson and Anne Koval

The Gentle Art of Making Enemies by James McNeill Whistler

Whistler on Art: Selected Letters and Writings of James McNeill Whistler edited by Nigel Thorp

Nadar’s Swift Tact

Nadar 14-July 9, 1995 an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, April

Nadar catalog of the exhibition by Maria Morris Hambourg and Françoise Heilbrun and Philippe Néagu, with contributions by Sylvie Aubenas and André Jammes and Ulrich Keller and Sophie Rochard and André Rouillé

The Riddle of Walter Benjamin

The Correspondence of Walter Benjamin, 1910–1940 edited and annotated by Gershom Scholem and Theodor W. Adorno, translated by Manfred Jacobson, translated by Evelyn Jacobson


Jeremy Bernstein’s books include Plutonium: A History of the World’s Most Dangerous Element , Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know and A Palette of Particles.
 His latest book is Nuclear Iran (October, 2014).

Norman Davies is the author of, among other books, Europe: A History, Rising 44: The Battle for Warsaw, and, most recently, Vanished Kingdoms: The History of Half-Forgotten Europe.

 (May 2013)

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied. Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), The Scientist as Rebel (2006, published by New York Review Books), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). New York Review Books will publish Dreams of Earth and Sky, a new collection of Dyson’s essays, in April 2015. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

John Golding (1929–2012) was a British painter and art historian. He taught at the Courtauld Institute and the Royal College of Art. Among his many books was Cubism: A History and an Analysis, which refuted the notion that Cubism represented a break with the realist tradition. Golding also curated exhibitions on both sides of the Atlantic, including Picasso: Painter/Sculpter and Matisse Picasso.