Contents


Culture War

The Apotheosis of Captain Cook: European Mythmaking in the Pacific by Gananath Obeyesekere

How ‘Natives’ Think, About Captain Cook, for Example by Marshall Sahlins

Italy’s Dirty Linen

Getting the Boot: Italy’s Unfinished Revolution by Matt Frei

The Crisis of the Italian State: From the Origins of the Cold War to the Fall of Berlusconi by Patrick McCarthy

The Myth of Barry Goldwater

Barry Goldwater by Robert Alan Goldberg

Goldwater: The Man Who Made A Revolution by Lee Edwards

Turning Right in the Sixties: The Conservative Capture of the GOP by Mary C. Brennan

The Perfectionist

William Morris: A Life for Our Time by Fiona MacCarthy

The Collected Letters of William Morris edited by Norman Kelvin

Vol. I, 1848–1880

Vol. II, Part A, 1881–1884

Vol. II, Part B, 1885–1888

Vols. III and IV forthcoming

Contributors

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book is a ­collection of essays from these pages, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the ­Shadows of War. His book Year Zero: A History of 1945 is now out in paperback.

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Clifford Geertz (1926–2006) was an anthropologist. Widely recognized as the most influential American anthropologist of the twentieth century, Geertz championed the role of symbols in the creation and interpretation of social meaning. His many books include Peddlers and Princes: Social Development and Economic Change in Two Indonesian Towns and Available Light: Anthropological Reflections on Philosophical Topics.

Richard Holmes is the author of Shelley: The Pursuit (published by NYRB Classics), which won the Somerset Maugham Award in 1974; Coleridge: Early Visions, winner of the 1989 Whitbread Book of the Year award; Dr Johnson & Mr Savage, which won the 1993 James Tait Black Prize; and Coleridge: Darker Reflections, which won the 1990 Duff Cooper Prize and Heinemann Award. His new book, Falling Upwards: How We Took to the Air, was published in October 2013. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and was awarded the Order of the British Empire in 1992. He is also a professor of biographical studies at the University of East Anglia. He lives in London and Norwich with the novelist Rose Tremain. The article in the December 18, 2014 issue draws on the seventh Leon Levy Biography Lecture, which he gave in 2014 on “The Two Sides of the Biographer’s Notebook.”

Richard Jenkyns, a Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, is Professor of the Classical Tradition at Oxford. His most recent book is Virgil’s Experience.(November 2001)

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.