Contents


Mrs. Thatcher’s Revenge

The Path to Power by Margaret Thatcher

Letters from London by Julian Barnes

The Disenchanted Isle: Mrs. Thatcher’s Capitalist Revolution by Charles Dellheim

The Philosopher of Selfless Love

Emmanuel Levinas by Marie-Anne Lescourret

In the Time of the Nations by Emmanuel Levinas, translated by Michael B. Smith

Outside the Subject by Emmanuel Levinas, translated by Michael B. Smith

Beyond the Verse: Talmudic Readings and Lectures by Emmanuel Levinas, translated by Gary D. Mole

Contributors

Joseph Brodsky (1940–1996) was a Russian poet and essayist. Born in Leningrad, Brodsky moved to the United States when he was exiled from Russia in 1972. His poetry collections include A Part of Speech andTo Urania; his essay collections include Less Than One, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Watermark. In 1987, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. He served as US Poet Laureate from 1991 to 1992.

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including *The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan* (1995), *The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West* (1996), *Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance* (2006), and *Year Zero: A History of 1945* (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to *The New York Review of Books*, *The New Yorker*, and *The New York Times*, among other publications.

J. M. Coetzee’s novel The Childhood of Jesus was published in March 2013. He is Professor of Literature at the University of Adelaide and in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Jean Daniel founded Le Nouvel Observateur, for which he remains the principal commentator. He has published over twenty books. (December 2011)

Denis Donoghue is University Professor at New York University, where he holds the Henry James Chair of English and American Letters. His works include The Practice of Reading, Words Alone: The Poet T.S. Eliot, and The American Classics.

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He has just published, with Edward Mortimer and Kerem Öktem, Freedom in Diversity: Ten Lessons for Public Policy from Britain, Canada, France, Germany and the United States.


Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

William Pfaff’s latest book is The Irony of Manifest Destiny: The Tragedy of America’s Foreign Policy.
 (June 2013)

Darryl Pinckney, a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author of a novel, High Cotton, and Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature. He lives in New York City.

Alan Ryan’s collected essays The Making of Modern Liberalism and his two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought were published last year.

Willibald Sauerländer is a former Director of the Central Institute for Art History in Munich. His latest book is Manet malt Monet: Ein Sommer in Argenteuil. (June 2013)

Gore Vidal (1925–2012) was an American novelist, essayist, and playwright. His many works include the memoirs Point to Point Navigation and Palimpsest, the novels The City and the Pillar, Myra Breckinridge, and Lincoln, and the collection United States: Essays 1952–1992.

John Weightman (1915–2004) was a critic and literary scholar. After working as a translator and announcer for the BBC French service, Weightman turned to the study of French literature. He taught at King’s College London and the University of London. His books include The Concept of the Avant-Gardeand The Cat Sat on the Mat: Language and the Absurd.

Michael Wood is the Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. His books include Literature and the Taste of Knowledge and Yeats and Violence