Contents


Degas in Chicago

Degas: Beyond Impressionism The Art Institute of Chicago, September 30, 1996–January 5, 1997. Press exhibition at the National Gallery, London, May 22–August 26, 1996;, Catalog of the exhibition by Richard Kendall

White Mischief

Up from Conservatism: Why the Right is Wrong for America by Michael Lind

The World Turned Right Side Up: A history of the Conservative Ascendancy in America by Godfrey Hodgson

Up Against the Wall

Dinosaur in a Haystack: Reflections in Natural History by Stephen Jay Gould

FULL HOUSE: The Spread of Excellence from Plato to Darwin by Stephen Jay Gould

Here To Stay

Ira Gershwin: The Art of the Lyricist by Philip Furia

The Poets of Tin Pan Alley: A History of America’s Great Lyricists by Philip Furia

The Complete Lyrics of Ira Gershwin edited by Robert Kimball

Gershwin: His Life and Music by Charles Schwartz

Lyrics on Several Occasions by Ira Gershwin

The Memory of All That: The Life of George Gershwin by Joan Peyser

Fascinating Rhythm: The Collaboration of George and Ira Gershwin by Deena Rosenberg

Dream Time

A Tale of Two Utopias: The Political Journey of the Generation of 1968 by Paul Berman

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications.

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

John Gregory Dunne (1932–2003) was a novelist, screenwriter and critic. His final novel is entitled Nothing Lost.

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Jason Epstein, former Editorial Director at Random House, was a founder of The New York Review and of the Library of America. He is the author of Eating: A Memoir. (Dectember 2013)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Steve Jones is Professor of Genetics at University College London and the author of In the Blood. (April 1998)

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Perry Link is Chancellorial Chair for Teaching Across Disciplines at the University of California at Riverside. He translated China’s Charter 08 manifesto, published in these pages, and recently 
co-edited No Enemies, No Hatred, a collection of essays and poems by Liu Xiaobo. His latest book isAn Anatomy of Chinese: Rhythm, Metaphor, Politics and he is finishing a translation of the autobiography of the Chinese dissident astrophysicist Fang Lizhi.

Fang Lizhi, an astrophysicist and former vice-president of the University of Science and Technology of China, was expelled from the Communist Party of China in 1987. He was granted asylum at the US embassy in Beijing before leaving the country in 1990. He is the 1989 recipient of the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award and is a professor of physics at the University of Arizona. (November 2011)

Kanan Makiya was born in Baghdad and teaches at Brandeis. His books include Republic of Fear: The Politics of Modern Iraq, Cruelty and Silence: War, Tyranny, Uprising, and the Arab World, and, most recently, The Rock: A Tale of Seventh-Century Jerusalem. (January 2002)

Alan Ryan’s On Tocqueville and On Marx were published this summer. He is a Visiting Professor of Philosophy at Stanford this year.

Michael Wood is the Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. His books include Literature and the Taste of Knowledge and Yeats and Violence