Contents


Silent Screams

Les Vampires (1915-1916) a film directed by Louis Feuillade

Irma Vep (1996) a film directed by Olivier Assayas

The Mystery of Irma Vep a revival of the 1984 production by Charles Ludlum, directed by and starring Everett Quinton. at the Westside Theatre, New York

Happy Birthday, Elliott Carter!

Elliott Carter: Collected Essays and Lectures, 1937-1995 edited by Jonathan W. Bernard

The Music of Elliott Carter, second edition by David Schiff, foreword by Elliott Carter

Wise Man

Isaiah Berlin: A Life by Michael Ignatieff

The Proper Study of Mankind: An Anthology of Essays by Isaiah Berlin, edited by Henry Hardy, by Roger Hausheer

Giant

Victor Hugo: A Biography by Graham Robb

Shadows of a Hand: The Drawings of Victor Hugo by Ann Philbin, by Florian Rodari

William James & the Case of the Epileptic Patient

Genuine Reality: A Life of William James by Linda Simon

William James Remembered edited by Linda Simon

The Thought and Character of William James by Ralph Barton Perry, with an introduction by Charlene Haddock Seigfried

Manhood at Harvard: William James and Others by Kim Townsend

The Correspondence of William James edited by Ignas K. Skrupskelis, by Elizabeth M. Berkeley

Volume 4, 1856-1877

Volume 5, 1878-1884

Volume 6, 1885-1889

Contributors

Kwame Anthony Appiah teaches philosophy at Princeton. His latest book is The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen.

 (November 2012)

James Chace is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Government and Public Law at Bard College. He is the author of Acheson and, most recently, 1912: The Election That Changed the Country. He is now working on a biography of Lafayette. (October 2004)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry. His most recent book is Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.

Malcolm Gladwell is the author of The Tipping Point: How Little Things Make a Big Difference. An archive of his articles for The New Yorker is available at www.gladwell.com. (February 2000)

John Gross (1935–2011) was an English editor and critic. From 1974 to 1981, he was editor of The Times Literary Supplement; he also served as senior book editor and critic at The New York Times. His memoir, A Double Thread, was published in 2001.

Christopher Hitchens (1949–2011) was a British-American journalist and social critic. Known for his confrontational style and contrarian views on a range of social issues, Hitchens was a frequent contributor to The Nation, The Atlantic, The Times Literary Supplement and Vanity Fair. Hitchens recounts his struggle with esophageal cancer in Mortality, which was published in 2012.

Leon Levy is currently the chairman of the board of trustees of the New York—based Oppenheimer Funds. He is president of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and vice-chairman of the Jerome Levy Institute for Economic Research at Bard College. (December 1998)

Simon Leys (1935–2014) was the pen name of Pierre Ryckmans, who was born in Belgium and settled in Australia in 1970. He taught Chinese literature at the Australian Na­tional University and was Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Sydney from 1987 to 1993. Leys was a contributor to such publications as The New York Review of Books, Le Monde, and Le Figaro Littéraire, writing on literature and contemporary China. Among his books are Chinese Shadows, Other People’s Thoughts, and The Wreck of the Batavia & Prosper. In addition to The Death of Napoleon NYRB publishes The Hall of Uselessness, a collection of essays, and On the Abolition of All Political Parties, an essay by Simone Weil that Leys translated and edited. His many awards include the Prix Renaudot, the Prix Femina, the Prix Guizot, and the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction.

Jeff Madrick is the director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Re­discovering Government Initiative at the Century Foundation and editor of Challenge Magazine. His new book is Seven Bad Ideas: How Mainstream Economists Damaged America and the World.


Norman Mailer (1923-2007) was born in Long Branch, New Jersey, and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. In 1955 he co-founded The Village Voice. He is the author of more than thirty books, including The Naked and the Dead; The Armies of the Night, for which he won a National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize; The Executioner’s Song, for which he won his second Pulitzer Prize; Harlot’s Ghost; Oswald’s Tale; The Gospel According to the Son; and The Castle in the Forest.

Louis Menand is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English at Harvard. His books include The Marketplace of Ideas, American Studies and The Metaphysical Club.

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His seventh collection of poetry, In a Mist, is to be published in the spring of 2015.


John Russell (1919–2008) was Chief Art Critic at The New York Times from 1982 until 1990. He was the author of many art-historical studies, including Matisse, Father & Son and The Meanings of Modern Art.

Alan Ryan’s On Tocqueville and On Marx were published last year. He is the author of the two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought: From Herodotus to the Present. He is visiting professor of philosophy at Stanford.


A. O. Scott is a film critic at The New York Times and the former Sunday book critic for Newsday. His writing has appeared in The New York Review of Books, Slate, and many other publications.

Keith Thomas is a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is the author The Ends of Life: Roads to Fulfillment in Early Modern England.