Contents


Missing Persons

The Commissar Vanishes: The Falsification of Photographs and Art in Stalin’s Russia by David King

Eyewitness to History: The Photographs of Yevgeny Khaldei with a biographical essay by Alexander Nakhimovsky, by Alice Nakhimovsky

Lost Horizons

Kundun a film directed by Martin Scorsese

Seven Years in Tibet a film directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud

Lost

As If: A Crime, a Trial, a Question of Childhood by Blake Morrison

The Missing by Andrew O'Hagan

Playboy of the Roman World

The Poet and the Prince: Ovid and Augustan Discourse by Alessandro Barchiesi

After Ovid: New Metamorphoses edited by Michael Hoffman, by James Lasdun

Tales from Ovid by Ted Hughes

The Metamorphoses of Ovid translated freely into verse by David R. Slavitt

Object Lessons

A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum 1997-January 18, 1998. Following its presentation in Baltimore, A Grand Design will travel to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (February 25-May 17, 1998); the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto (J an exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art, October 12,, Catalog of the exhibition edited by Malcolm Baker, by Brenda Richardson

Photography: An Independent Art: Photographs from the Victoria and Albert Museum 1839-1996 by Mark Haworth-Booth

On the Brink

One Hell of a Gamble’: Khrushchev, Castro, and Kennedy, 1958-1964 by Aleksandr Fursenko, by Timothy Naftali

The Kennedy Tapes: Inside the White House during the Cuban Missile Crisis edited by Ernest R. May, by Philip D. Zelikow

The Other Missiles of October: Eisenhower, Kennedy, and the Jupiters, 1957-1963 by Philip Nash

Contributors

Al Alvarez is the author of Risky Business, a selection of essays, many of which first appeared in The New York Review of Books.

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Neal Ascherson is the author of The Struggles for Poland, The Black Sea, and Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.


James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

P. N. Furbank is the author of nine books, including biographies of Samuel Butler, Italo Svevo, and E.M. Forster.

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916-2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.

Václav Havel (1936–2011) was the last president of Czechoslovakia and the first president of the Czech Republic. Havel was one of the six signers of the statement “Tibet: The Peace of the Graveyard.”

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. He is the author of several books, including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, and The Global Soul. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and other publications and his most recent book is The Man Within My Head.

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

John Kidd is the founding director of the James Joyce Research Centre at Boston University. (September 1997)

Bernard Knox (1914–2010) was an English classicist. He was the first director of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Among his many books are The Heroic Temper, The Oldest Dead White European Males, and Backing into the Future: The Classical Tradition and Its Renewal. He is the editor of The Norton Book of Classical Literature and wrote the introductions and notes for Robert Fagles’s translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Noel Malcolm is a Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. His books include Bosnia: A Short History and Kosovo: A Short History. (December 2007)

Luc Sante is the author of Low Life, Evidence, The Factory of Facts, Kill All Your Darlings, and Folk Photography. He has translated Félix Fénéon’s Novels in Three Lines and written the introduction to George Simenon’s The Man Who Watched Trains Go By (both available as NYRB Classics). He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard College.

Ronald Steel is Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern California, a recent fellow at the American Academy in Berlin, and the author of biographies of Walter Lippmann and Robert Kennedy.

Tatyana Tolstaya was born in Leningrad in 1951 to an aristocratic family that includes the writers Leo and Alexei Tolstoy. After completing a degree in classics at Leningrad State University, Tolstaya worked for several years at a Moscow publishing house. In the mid-1980s, she began publishing short stories in literary magazines and her first story collection established her as one of the foremost writers of the Gorbachev era. She spent much of the late Eighties and Nineties living in the United States and teaching at several universities. Known for her acerbic essays on contemporary Russian life, Tolstaya has also been the co-host of the Russian cultural interview television program School for Scandal. Both her novel, The Slynx and her collection of stories, White Walls, are published by NYRB Classics.

John Weightman (1915–2004) was a critic and literary scholar. After working as a translator and announcer for the BBC French service, Weightman turned to the study of French literature. He taught at King’s College London and the University of London. His books include The Concept of the Avant-Gardeand The Cat Sat on the Mat: Language and the Absurd.

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. His new book, Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare’s Time, will be published in the summer 2014.