Contents


The Return of Janet Lewis

The Dear Past (1994) by Janet Lewis

The Wife of Martin Guerre (1941) by Janet Lewis

Goodbye, Son (1943) by Janet Lewis

The Invasion (1932) by Janet Lewis

The Trial of Soren Qvist (1947) by Janet Lewis

The Ghost of Monsieur Scarron (1959) by Janet Lewis

Grand Illusion

One Nation, After All by Alan Wolfe

Someone Else’s House: America’s Unfinished Struggle for Integration by Tamar Jacoby

Reaching Beyond Race by Paul M. Sniderman, by Edward G. Carmines

Portrait of American Jews: The Last Half of the 20th Century by Samuel C. Heilman

Roberts vs. Texaco: A True Story of Race and Corporate America by Bari-Ellen Roberts, with Jack E. White

How to Think About the Swiss

The Swiss, the Gold, and the Dead: How Swiss Bankers Helped Finance the Nazi War Machine by Jean Ziegler

Hitler’s Silent Partners: Swiss Banks, Nazi Gold, and the Pursuit of Justice by Isabel Vincent

Hitler’s Secret Bankers: The Myth of Swiss Neutrality During the Holocaust by Adam LeBor

Movements of Nazi Gold: Uncovering the Trail by Sidney Zabludoff

Horace, Our Contemporary

Horace in English edited by D.S. Carne-Ross, by Kenneth Haynes, with an introduction by D.S. Carne-Ross

The Odes of Horace bilingual edition, translation by Ferry David

A Big Business

The Slave Trade: The Story of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1440-1870 by Hugh Thomas

The Making of New World Slavery: From the Baroque to the Modern, 1492-1800 by Robin Blackburn

Justice for Scalia

A Matter of Interpretation: Federal Courts and the Law by Antonin Scalia, with commentary by Amy Gutmann editor, by Gordon S. Wood, by Laurence H. Tribe, by Mary Ann Glendon, by Ronald Dworkin

Contributors

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

Alma Guillermoprieto often writes on Latin America in these pages. She lives in Mexico City. (November 2012)

Andrew Hacker teaches political science at Queens College. He is currently working on a book on mathematics. 
 (January 2014)

Ann Hulbert is a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the author of The Interior Castle: The Art and Life of Jean Stafford. She is currently at work on a book about twentieth-century American child-rearing experts. (June 1998)

Bernard Knox (1914–2010) was an English classicist. He was the first director of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Among his many books are The Heroic Temper, The Oldest Dead White European Males, and Backing into the Future: The Classical Tradition and Its Renewal. He is the editor of The Norton Book of Classical Literature and wrote the introductions and notes for Robert Fagles’s translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Simon Leys is the pen name of Pierre Ryckmans, who was born in Belgium and settled in Australia in 1970. He taught Chinese literature at the Australian National University and was Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Sydney from 1987 to 1993. Leys’s writing has appeared in The New York Review of Books, Le Monde, Le Figaro Littéraire, and other periodicals. Among his books are Chinese Shadows, The Death of Napoleon (forthcoming from NYRB Classics), Other People’s Thoughts, and The Wreck of the Batavia & Prosper. In 1996 he delivered the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Boyer lectures. His many awards include the Prix Renaudot, the Prix Femina, the Prix Guizot, and the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction.

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

V. S. Naipaul was born in Trinidad in 1932 and emigrated to England in 1950, when he won a scholarship to University College, Oxford. He is the author of many novels, including A House for Mr. Biswas, A Bend in the River, and In a Free State, which won the Booker Prize. He has also written several nonfiction works based on his travels, including India: A Million Mutinies Now and Beyond Belief: Islamic Excursions Among the Converted Peoples. He was knighted in 1990 and in 1993 was the first recipient of the David Cohen British Literature Prize.

Robert Post is the Alexander F. and May T. Morrison Professor of Law at the School of Law at Berkeley. (June 1998)

Ingrid D. Rowland is a professor, based in Rome, at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. A frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, she is the author of The Culture of the High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome and The Scarith of Scornello: A Tale of Renaissance Forgery. She has also published a translation of Vitruvius’ Ten Books of Architecture and a history of Villa Taverna, the US ambassador’s residence in Rome. Her new book is From Pompeii: The Afterlife of a Roman Town.


John Ryle is Chair of the Rift Valley Institute, a network of regional specialists working in East and Northeast Africa. (August 2004)

Luc Sante is the author of Low Life, Evidence, The Factory of Facts, Kill All Your Darlings, and Folk Photography. He has translated Félix Fénéon’s Novels in Three Lines and written the introduction to George Simenon’s The Man Who Watched Trains Go By (both available as NYRB Classics). He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard College.

Margaret Scott, formerly the Cultural Editor of the Far Eastern Economic Review, is a writer specializing in Asia. (August 1998)

Alexander Stille is San Paolo Professor of International Journalism at Columbia. His most recent book is a memoir, The Force of Things: A Marriage in War and Peace. (December 2013)

Patricia Storace is the author of Heredity, a book of poems, Dinner with Persephone, a travel memoir about Greece, and Sugar Cane, a children’s book. Her new novel is new novel is A Book of Heaven. She lives in New York.