Contents


A Wind from the West

Il Rinascimento a Venezia e la pittura del Nord ai tempi di Bellini, Dürer, Tiziano [The Venetian Renaissance and Northern Painting in the Time of Bellini, Dürer, and Titian] 1999-January 9, 2000. an exhibition at the Palazzo Grassi, Venice,September 5,, Catalog of the exhibition edited by Bernard Aikema, by Beverly Louise Brown

Keeping the Reader Alive

Remembering Randall: A Memoir of Poet, Critic, and Teacher Randall Jarrell by Mary von Schrader Jarrell

No Other Book: Selected Essays by Randall Jarrell, edited and with an introduction by Brad Leithauser

Jews and Blacks in America

In the Almost Promised Land: American Jews and Blacks, 1915-1935 by Hasia Diner

Struggles in the Promised Land: Toward a History of Black-Jewish Relations in the United States edited by Jack Salzman, by Cornel West

Blacks in the Jewish Mind: A Crisis of Liberalism by Seth Forman

What Went Wrong? The Creation and Collapse of the Black-Jewish Alliance by Murray Friedman

African Americans and Jews in the Twentieth Century: Studies in Convergence and Conflict edited by V.P. Franklin, by Nancy L. Grant, by Harold M. Kletnick, by Genna Rae McNeil

killing rage: ending racism by bell hooks

Contributors

J. M. Coetzee’s novel The Childhood of Jesus was published in March 2013. He is Professor of Literature at the University of Adelaide and in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

Helen Epstein is a writer specializing in public health and an adjunct professor at Bard College. She has advised numerous organizations, including the United States Agency for International Development, the World Bank, Human Rights Watch, and UNICEF. She is the author of The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight Against AIDS in Africa and has contributed articles to many publications, including The New York Review of Books and The New York Times Magazine.

Sue Halpern, a regular contributor to The New York Review on the subject of technology, is scholar-in-residence at Middlebury. Her most recent book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home.
 (November 2014)

Christopher Hitchens (1949–2011) was a British-American journalist and social critic. Known for his confrontational style and contrarian views on a range of social issues, Hitchens was a frequent contributor to The Nation, The Atlantic, The Times Literary Supplement and Vanity Fair. Hitchens recounts his struggle with esophageal cancer in Mortality, which was published in 2012.

Charles Hope was Director of the Warburg Institute, London, from 2001 to 2010. He is the author of Titian.


Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Kenneth Koch (1925–2002) was Professor of English at Columbia. During his lifetime, Koch published at least thirty volumes of poetry and plays. He was also the author of a novel, The Red Robins; two books on teaching poetry writing to children, Wishes, Lies, and Dreams and Rose, Where Did You Get That Red?; and I Never Told Anybody: Teaching Poetry Writing in a Nursing Home.

Mark Lilla is Professor of the Humanities at Columbia 
and author of The Stillborn God: Politics, Religion, and the Modern West.



Hugh Lloyd-Jones is the Regius Professor of Greek Emeritus at Oxford University. His many books include The Justice of Zeus, the Oxford Text of Sophocles, and three volumes of Sophocles for the Loeb Classical Library. (December 2000)

Leo Marx is the Kenan Professor of American Cultural History (Emeritus) at MIT and most recently the editor, with Bruce Mazlish, of Progress:Fact or Illusion? (July 1999)

Louis Menand is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English at Harvard. His books include The Marketplace of Ideas, American Studies and The Metaphysical Club.

John Russell (1919–2008) was Chief Art Critic at The New York Times from 1982 until 1990. He was the author of many art-historical studies, including Matisse, Father & Son and The Meanings of Modern Art.

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit: Angstrom, he two of which, Rabbit is Richand Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Lawrence Weschler is the Director of the New York Institute for the Humanities at New York University. Earlier this year he published True to Life: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with David Hockney and an expanded edition of Seeing Is Forgetting the Name of the Thing One Sees: Over Thirty Years of Conversationswith Robert Irwin. (October 2009)

Michael Wood is the Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. His books include Literature and the Taste of Knowledge and Yeats and Violence