Contents


The Threat to Proust

A la recherche du temps perdu, 1987-1989: Vol. 1 by Marcel Proust, edited by Jean-Yves Tadié

A la recherche du temps perdu, 1987-1989: Vol. 2 by Marcel Proust, edited by Jean-Yves Tadié

A la recherche du temps perdu, 1987-1989: Vol. 3 by Marcel Proust, edited by Jean-Yves Tadié

A la recherche du temps perdu, 1987-1989: Vol. 4 by Marcel Proust, edited by Jean-Yves Tadié

Marcel Proust by Edmund White

Passion Play

Crazy Horse by Larry McMurtry

Crazy Horse: The Strange Man of the Oglalas by Mari Sandoz, Introduction by Stephen B. Oates

Red Cloud: Warrior-Statesman of the Lakota Sioux by Robert W. Larson

The Lance and the Shield: The Life and Times of Sitting Bull by Robert M. Utley

Plains Indian Drawings, 1865-1935: Pages from a Visual History edited by Janet Catherine Berlo

Working Toward the Führer’

Germans into Nazis by Peter Fritzsche

Hitler, 1889-1936: Hubris by Ian Kershaw

Hitler’s Vienna: A Dictator’s Appenticeship by Brigitte Hamann, translated by Thomas Thornton

Where Ghosts Walked: Munich’s Road to the Third Reich by David Clay Large

Homer Lives!

Who Killed Homer?: The Demise of Classical Education and the Recovery of Greek Wisdom by Victor Davis Hanson, by John Heath

Contributors

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

J. M. Coetzee’s novel The Childhood of Jesus was published in March 2013. He is Professor of Literature at the University of Adelaide and in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Robert Darnton is Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and University Librarian at Harvard. 
His forthcoming book is Censors at Work: How States Shaped Literature.

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He has just published, with Edward Mortimer and Kerem Öktem, Freedom in Diversity: Ten Lessons for Public Policy from Britain, Canada, France, Germany and the United States.


Peter Green is Dougherty Centennial Professor Emeritus of Classics at the University of Texas at Austin and Adjunct Professor at the University of Iowa. His most recent book is The Hellenistic Age: A Short History. (April 2014)

Ian Hacking teaches philosophy at the University of Toronto. From 2000 to 2006 Hacking held the chair of Philosophy and History of Scientific Concepts at the Collège de France. His most recent book is Historical Ontology.

Derek Jarrett is Editor of the Yale edition of Horace Walpole’s Memoirs. His edition of The Memoirs of the Reign of George III will be published later this year. (March 1999)

Fiona Maccarthy is the author of biographies of Eric Gill, William Morris, and Lord Byron. Her most recent book, The Last Pre-Raphaelite: Edward Burne-Jones and the Victorian Imagination, was published last year. (April 2013)

Thomas Powers is the author of The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA (1979), Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the German Bomb (1993), Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda (2002; revised and expanded edition, 2004), and The Confirmation (2000), a novel. He won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1971 and has contributed to The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Nation, The Atlantic, and Rolling Stone. His latest book, The Killing of Crazy Horse, won the 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. He is currently writing a memoir of his father, who once told him that the last time he met Clare Boothe Luce was in the office of Allen Dulles.


Charles Rosen is a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Ingrid D. Rowland is a professor, based in Rome, at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. A frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, she is the author of The Culture of the High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome and The Scarith of Scornello: A Tale of Renaissance Forgery. She has also published a translation of Vitruvius’ Ten Books of Architecture and a history of Villa Taverna, the US ambassador’s residence in Rome. Her new book is From Pompeii: The Afterlife of a Roman Town.


Roger Shattuck (1923–2005) was an American writer and scholar of French culture. He taught at Harvard, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Virginia, and Boston University, where he was named University Professor. His books includeForbidden Knowledge: From Prometheus to Pornography.

Jonathan Spence is Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. Among his books are The Death of Woman Wang, Treason by the Book, The Question of Hu, and The Search for Modern China.