Contents


Ménage à Trois

Briefe 1925 bis 1975 und andere Zeugnisse by Hannah Arendt, by Martin Heidegger, edited by Ursula Ludz

Dutch Treat

Adriaen de Vries (1556-1626): Imperial Sculptor 1999-January 9, 2000. Museum, Los Angeles/ Zwolle: Waanders Publishers an exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, October 12,, Catalog of the exhibition by Frits Scholten

Lives of a Poet

Crux: The Letters of James Dickey edited by Matthew J. Bruccoli, by Judith S. Baughman

James Dickey: The Selected Poems edited with an introduction by Robert Kirschten

The James Dickey Reader edited by Henry Hart

Virgil the Great

Virgil’s Epic Designs: Ekphrasis in the Aeneid by Michael C.J. Putnam

Virgil: His Life and Times by Peter Levi

Virgil’s Experience: Nature and History; Times, Names, and Places by Richard Jenkyns

Contributors

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of many novels, including The Book of Evidence, The Untouchable, Eclipse, The Sea (winner of the Man Booker Prize), and Ancient Light. As Benjamin Black he has written six crime novels, including Vengeance.

Anne Barton is a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. She is the author of Essays, Mainly Shakespearean.

Hans A. Bethe is Professor Emeritus of Physics at Cornell University. During the construction of the first atomic bomb he was head of the Theoretical Physics Division at Los Alamos and he has worked on arms control for the last forty years. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1967. (November 2000)

Denis Donoghue is University Professor at New York University, where he holds the Henry James Chair of English and American Letters. His works include The Practice of Reading, Words Alone: The Poet T.S. Eliot, and The American Classics.

Amos Elon (1926–2009) was an Israeli journalist. His final book was The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews In Germany 1743 – 1933.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He currently leads the Free Speech Debate project at Oxford (freespeechdebate.com) and is writing a book about free speech.


Louise Glück’s Poems 1962–2012 was published last year. (November 2013)

Stuart Hampshire (1914–2004) was an English philosopher. He taught at University College London, Princeton, Stanford and Oxford, where he was named Warden of Wadham College. His books include Thought and Action, Spinoza and Justice Is Conflict.

Bernard Knox (1914–2010) was an English classicist. He was the first director of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Among his many books are The Heroic Temper, The Oldest Dead White European Males, and Backing into the Future: The Classical Tradition and Its Renewal. He is the editor of The Norton Book of Classical Literature and wrote the introductions and notes for Robert Fagles’s translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Mark Lilla is Professor of the Humanities at Columbia 
and author of The Stillborn God: Politics, Religion, and the Modern West.



Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

John Allen Paulos is Professor of Mathematics at Temple University and the author of Innumeracy and, most recently, Irreligion: A Mathematician Explains Why the Arguments for God Just Don’t Add Up. (April 2010)

Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

Alan Ryan’s On Tocqueville and On Marx were published this summer. He is a Visiting Professor of Philosophy at Stanford this year.

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life. His article in this issue draws on his essay in Tyringham Topics.
 (February 2013)