Contents


Ghosts in the House

Frank O. Gehry: The Complete Works by Francesco Dal Co, by Kurt W. Forster

Frank O. Gehry: Guggenheim Museum Bilbao by Coosje van Bruggen

Frank O. Gehry: Guggenheim Bilbao Museoa text by Kurt W. Forster, photographs by Ralph Richter

Gehry Talks: Architecture + Process edited by Mildred Friedman, with an essay by Michael Sorkin, commentaries by Frank O. Gehry

Frank O. Gehry: Kurt W. Forster Art Publishers) edited by Christina Bechtler, in collaboration with Kunsthaus Bregenz

The Unmaking of Men

Stiffed: The Betrayal of the American Man by Susan Faludi

The Decline of Males by Lionel Tiger

The Dark Side of Man:Tracing the Origins of Male Violence by Michael P. Ghiglieri

What Our Mothers Didn’t Tell Us: Why Happiness Eludes the Modern Woman by Danielle Crittenden

A Return to Modesty: Discovering the Lost Virtue by Wendy Shalit

The First Sex: The Natural Talents of Women and How They Are Changing the World by Helen Fisher

Lost Treasures

From Pigalle to Préault: Neoclassicism and the Sublime in French Sculpture, 1760-1840 by Alison West

The Magic of Bohemia

Prague in Black and Gold: Scenes in the Life of a European City by Peter Demetz

The Coasts of Bohemia: A Czech History by Derek Sayer

The Best He Could Do

True at First Light by Ernest Hemingway, edited with an introduction by Patrick Hemingway

Hemingway: The Final Years by Michael Reynolds

Hemingway and His Conspirators: Hollywood, Scribners, and the Making of American Celebrity Culture by Leonard J. Leff

Hemingway: The Postwar Years and the Posthumous Novels by Rose Marie Burwell

Contributors

Jonathan Aaron’s new collection of poems, Journey to the Lost City, has just been published. (August 2006)

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications.

Denis Donoghue is University Professor at New York University, where he holds the Henry James Chair of English and American Letters. His works include The Practice of Reading, Words Alone: The Poet T.S. Eliot, and The American Classics.

R. J. W. Evans is a Fellow of Oriel College and Regius Professor of History Emeritus at Oxford. His books include Austria, Hungary, and the Habsburgs: Central Europe, c. 1683–1867. (February 2014)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Martin Filler’s latest book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II, has been long-listed for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Filler was born in 1948 and received degrees in art history from Columbia University. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and his writing on modern architecture has been published in more than thirty journals, magazines, and newspapers in the US, Europe, and Japan. His first collection of New York Review essays, Makers of Modern Architecture, was published in 2007. Filler is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife, the architectural historian Rosemarie Haag Bletter, live in New York and Southampton.

Thomas Flanagan (1923–2002), the grandson of Irish immigrants, grew up in Greenwich, Connecticut, where he ran the school newspaper with his friend Truman Capote. Flanagan attended Amherst College (with a two-year hiatus to serve in the Pacific Fleet) and earned his Ph.D. from Columbia University, where he studied under Lionel Trilling while also writing stories for Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. In 1959, he published an important scholarly work, The Irish Novelists, 1800 to 1850, and the next year he moved to Berkeley, where he was to teach English and Irish literature at the University of California for many years. In 1978 he took up a post at the State University of New York at Stonybrook, from which he retired in 1996. Flanagan and his wife Jean made annual trips to Ireland, where he struck up friendships with many writers, including Benedict Kiely and Seamus Heaney, whom he in turn helped bring to the United States. His intimate knowledge of Ireland’s history and literature also helped to inspire his trilogy of historical novels, starting with The Year of the French (1979, winner of the National Critics’ Circle award for fiction) and continuing with The Tenants of Time (1988) and The End of the Hunt (1994). Flanagan was a frequent contributor to many publications, including The New York Review of Books, The New York Times, and The Kenyon Review. A collection of his essays, There You Are: Writing on Irish and American Literature and History, is also published by New York Review Books.

Andrew Hacker teaches political science and mathematics 
at Queens College. His new book, The Math Myth, will appear in the spring. (October 2014)

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. He is the author of several books, including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, and The Global Soul. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and other publications and his most recent book is The Man Within My Head.

Eric L. McKitrick (1920–2002) was a historian of the United States. Educated at Columbia, McKitrick taught at the University of Chicago and Rutgers before returning to Columbia in 1960. He is perhaps best known for Andrew Johnson and Reconstruction; his other works treated slavery and the American South, as well as the history of the American party system.

Lars-Erik Nelson (1941-2000) was the Washington columnist for the New York Daily News, and a frequent contributor to the Review.

Joyce Carol Oates is the Roger S. Berlind Professor in the Lewis Arts Center at Princeton. Her newest story ­collection is Lovely, Dark, Deep.


Charles Rosen is a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He has published some twenty collections of poetry, six books of essays, a memoir, and numerous translations. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Simic’s recent works include Voice at 3 a.m., a selection of later and new poems; Master of Disguises, new poems; and Confessions of a Poet Laureate, a collection of short essays that was published by New York Review Books as an e-book original. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. His New and Selected Poems: 1962–2012 was published in March 2013. His article in this issue, August 14, 2014, was delivered as a talk at the Manggha Museum of ­Japanese Art and Technology in Kraków earlier this year, when he was presented with the Zbigniew Herbert International Literary Award.


Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas at Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book for general readers is Lake Views: This World and the Universe.