Contents


Notes from Underground

Know Thine Enemy: A Spy’s Journey into Revolutionary Iran by Edward Shirley

Irreparable Harm: A Firsthand Account of How One Agent Took on the CIA in an Epic Battle Over Secrecy and Free Speech by Frank Snepp

Hurry Up Please It’s Time

Investigating the Impact of the Year 2000 Problem by 105th Congress Special Committee on the Y2K Technology Problem

The Simple Living Journal’s Y2K Preparation Guide: 110 Ways to Create a Sustainable Life—Crisis or Not by Janet Luhrs, by Cris Evatt

Y2K: The Millennium Bug by Tiggre Don L.

Y2K: The Millennium Crisis by Bradford Morgan

Get Rich with Y2K: How to Cash in on the Financial Crisis in the Year 2000 by Porter Steven L.

Time Bomb 2000: What the Year 2000 Computer CrisisMeans to You! by Yourdon Edward, by Yourdon Jennifer

How New Is the New Economy?

Turbulence in the World Economy by Robert Brenner

Myths of Rich & Poor: Why We’re Better Off Than We Think by W. Michael Cox, by Richard Alm

Foundations of the Goldilocks Economy: Supply Shocks and the Time-Varying Nairu” by Robert J. Gordon

The High Pressure U.S. Labor Market of the 1990s” by Alan Kreuger, by Lawrence Katz

The New Dollars and Dreams: Americans Incomes and Economic Change by Frank Levy

Computers and Aggregate Economic Growth” by Daniel E. Siche

Economic Statistics, the New Economy, and the Productivity Slowdown” by Jack E. Triplett

The Emerging Digital Economy by Department of Commerce

Contributors

Anne Barton is a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. She is the author of Essays, Mainly Shakespearean.

J. M. Coetzee’s novel The Childhood of Jesus was published in March 2013. He is Professor of Literature at the University of Adelaide and in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

James Fallows is National Correspondent for The Atlantic.His books include Free Flight: Inventing the Future of Travel, Blind into Baghdad: America’s War in Iraq, and China Airborne.

Caroline Fraser ‘s most recent book, Rewilding the World: Dispatches from the Conservation Revolution, was published in December. (May 2010)

Václav Havel (1936–2011) was the last president of Czechoslovakia and the first president of the Czech Republic. Havel was one of the six signers of the statement “Tibet: The Peace of the Graveyard.”

Daniel J. Kevles is Stanley Woodward Professor of History at Yale. His recent works include The Baltimore Case and he is currently completing a history of intellectual property in plants, animals, and people.


Bernard Knox (1914–2010) was an English classicist. He was the first director of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Among his many books are The Heroic Temper, The Oldest Dead White European Males, and Backing into the Future: The Classical Tradition and Its Renewal. He is the editor of The Norton Book of Classical Literature and wrote the introductions and notes for Robert Fagles’s translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Jeff Madrick is Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz ­Rediscovery Government Initiative at the Century Foundation, Editor of Challenge Magazine, and teaches at the Cooper Union. His forthcoming book is Seven Bad Ideas: How Mainstream Econ­omists Damaged America and the World, to be published in the fall of 2014.

William H. McNeill is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Chicago. His most recent books are The Pursuit of Truth: A Historian’s Memoir and Summers Long Ago: On Grandfather’s Farm and in Grandmother’s Kitchen, published by the Berkshire Publishing Group. His most recent publication, as editor, is the second edition of the Encyclopedia of World History.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Lars-Erik Nelson (1941-2000) was the Washington columnist for the New York Daily News, and a frequent contributor to the Review.

Alan Ryan’s On Tocqueville and On Marx were published this summer. He is a Visiting Professor of Philosophy at Stanford this year.

Edward W. Said is University Professor at Columbia University and the author of Orientalism and Culture and Imperialism. His The End of the Peace Process: Oslo and After was published last spring. Reflections on Exile will appear in early 2001. (November 2000)

Orville Schell is the former Dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley, and currently the Arthur Ross Director of the Center on US–China Relations at the Asia Society in New York City. (May 2010)

Tom Stoppard’s most recent play, The Invention of Love, will have its first American productions in January at the American Conservatory Theater, San Francisco, and in February at the Wilma Theater, Philadelphia. (September 1999)