Contents


The Triumph of Marxism

Groucho: The Life and Times of Julius Henry Marx by Stefan Kanfer

The Essential Groucho: Writings by, for, and about Groucho Marx edited by Stefan Kanfer

Monkey Business: The Lives and Legends of the Marx Brothers by Simon Louvish

Watch Out, Democrats!

America’s Forgotten Majority: Why the White Working Class Still Matters by Ruy Teixeira and Joel Rogers

Government Works: Why Americans Need the Feds by Milton J. Esman

The Selling of ‘Free Trade’: NAFTA, Washington, and the Subversion of American Democracy by John R. MacArthur

Democracy Derailed: Initiative Campaigns and the Power of Money by David S. Broder

The New Prince: Machiavelli Updated for the Twenty-First Century by Dick Morris

London’s New Left Bank

Tate Modern: The Handbook edited by Iwona Blazwick and Simon Wilson

Representing Britain 1500-2000: 100 Works from Tate Collections by Martin Myrone

Fascinatin’ Rhythm

Harry Partch by Bob Gilmore

Enclosure 3: Harry Partch edited and with an essay by Philip Blackburn

Bitter Music: Collected Journals, Essays, Introductions, and Librettos by Harry Partch, edited and with an introduction by Thomas McGeary

Genesis of a Music by Harry Partch

The New American Way of War

Lifting the Fog of War by Admiral Bill Owens, with Ed Offley

Private Warriors by Ken Silverstein

Fire in the East: The Rise of Asian Military Power and the Second Nuclear Age by Paul Bracken

Total War 2006: The Future History of Global Conflict by Simon Pearson

Gulf War Air Power Survey by Eliot Cohen. others.

Iraq and the War of Sanctions: Conventional Threats and Weapons of Mass Destruction by Anthony H. Cordesman

Contributors

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

István Deák is Seth Low Professor Emeritus at Columbia. He is the author, with Jan Gross and Tony Judt, of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath.

Helen Epstein is a writer specializing in public health and an adjunct professor at Bard College. She has advised numerous organizations, including the United States Agency for International Development, the World Bank, Human Rights Watch, and UNICEF. She is the author of The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight Against AIDS in Africa.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (October 2017)

David Hajdu, author of Lush Life and Positively 4th Street, teaches at Syracuse University and is music critic for The New Republic. (June 2005)

Michael Ignatieff is President of Central European University in Budapest. His books include Isaiah Berlin: A Life and The Lesser Evil: Political Ethics in an Age of Terror.
 (April 2017)

Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

John Leonard writes on books every month for Harper’s and on television every week for New York magazine. (June 2007)

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Lars-Erik Nelson (1941-2000) was the Washington columnist for the New York Daily News, and a frequent contributor to the Review.

Joyce Carol Oates’s Beautiful Days, a collection of stories, will be published in February. She is currently Distinguished Writer in Residence in the Graduate Program at NYU. (December 2017)

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His books include Sonata for Jukebox and Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012.
 (September 2017)

Amartya Sen teaches economics and philosophy at Harvard. He was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1998. (June 2017)