Contents


Clinton & His Enemies

Dead Center: Clinton-Gore Leadership and the Perils of Moderation by James MacGregor Burns, by Georgia J. Sorenson

Vote.com by Dick Morris

Clinton’s World: Remaking American Foreign Policy by William G. Hyland

Looking at a Snowdrop

A Year at North Hill: Four Seasons in a Vermont Garden by Joe Eck, by Wayne Winterrowd

Annuals and Biennials by Roger Phillips, by Martyn Rix

The Genus Galanthus by Aaron P. Davis, illustrated by Christabel King

My Garden (Book) by Jamaica Kincaid, illustrated by Jill Fox

My Favorite Plant: Writers and Gardeners on the Plants They Love edited by Jamaica Kincaid

The Explorer’s Garden: Rare and Unusual Perennials by Daniel J. Hinckley

Small Books of Great Gardens: Alhambra: A Moorish Paradise Enchantment, each volume, 79 photographs by Claire de Virieu, text by Gabrielle van Zuylen, by Gilles de Brissac, by Pierre Bergé, by Madison Cox, by Lauro Marchetti, by Esrne Howard

A Dying World

One River: Explorations and Discoveries in the Amazon Rain Forest by Wade Davis

The Amazon River Forest: A Natural History of Plants, Animals, and People by Nigel J.H. Smith

Game Without End

The Theatrical Notebooks of Samuel Beckett: Volume IV: The Shorter Plays edited by S.E. Gontarski

No Author Better Served: The Correspondence of Samuel Beckett and Alan Schneider edited by Maurice Harmon

Talk!

L’Art de la conversation edited by Jacqueline Hellegouarc'h, with a preface by Marc Fumaroli

De l’air galant’ et autres Conversations (1653-1686): Pour une étude de l’archive galante by Madeleine de Scudéry, edited by Delphine Denis

Correspondence: Models of Letter-Writing from the Middle Ages to the Nineteenth Century by Roger Chartier, by Alain Boureau, by Cécile Dauphin, translated by Christopher Woodall

Les Caractères by Jean de La Bruyère, edited by Louis Van Delft

Contributors

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of many novels, including The Book of Evidence, The Untouchable, Eclipse, The Sea (winner of the Man Booker Prize), and Ancient Light. As Benjamin Black he has written six crime novels, including Vengeance.

Joseph Brodsky (1940–1996) was a Russian poet and essayist. Born in Leningrad, Brodsky moved to the United States when he was exiled from Russia in 1972. His poetry collections include A Part of Speech andTo Urania; his essay collections include Less Than One, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Watermark. In 1987, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. He served as US Poet Laureate from 1991 to 1992.

Benedetta Craveri is a professor of French literature at the University of Tuscia, Viterbo, and the Istituto Universitario Suor Orsola Benincasa, Naples. She regularly contributes to The New York Review of Books and to the cultural pages of the Italian newspaper La Repubblica. Her books include Madame du Deffand and Her World, La Vie privée du Maréchal de Richelieu, and Amanti e regine: Il potere delle donne. She is married to a French diplomat.

Andrew Delbanco is Levi Professor in the Humanities at Columbia. He is working on a book about the United States in the 1850s.
 (March 2014)

Rosemary Dinnage’s books include The Ruffian on the Stair, One to One: Experiences of Psychotherapy, and Annie Besant.

D.J. Enright (1920–2002) was a British poet, novelist and critic. He held teaching positions in Egypt, Japan, Thailand, Singapore and the United Kingdom. In 1981 Enright was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Ernst Gombrich (1909–2001) was an Austrian art historian. Born in Vienna, Gombrich studied at the Theresianum and then at the University of Vienna under Julius von Schlosser. After graduating, he worked as a Research Assistant and collaborator with the museum curator and Freudian analyst Ernst Kris. He joined the Warburg Institute in London as a Research Assistant in 1936 and was named Director in 1959. His major works include The Story of Art, Art and Illusion: A Study in the Psychology of Pictorial Representation, Aby Warburg: An Intellectual Biography, The Sense of Order: A Study in the Psychology of Decorative Art.

Anthony Hecht’sCollected Later Poems and Melodies Unheard: Essays on the Mysteries of Poetry were published in 2003. He died on October 20. (December 2004)

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Lars-Erik Nelson (1941-2000) was the Washington columnist for the New York Daily News, and a frequent contributor to the Review.

Fintan O’Toole is Literary Editor of The Irish Times and Leonard L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton. His latest book is A History of Ireland in 100 Objects. (December 2013)

Tim Parks, a novelist, essayist, and translator, is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. He has recently published the novel Sex Is Forbidden and the travel book Italian Ways: On and Off the Rails from Milan to Palermo.


Charles Rosen is a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He has published some twenty collections of poetry, six books of essays, a memoir, and numerous translations. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Simic’s recent works include Voice at 3 a.m., a selection of later and new poems; Master of Disguises, new poems; and Confessions of a Poet Laureate, a collection of short essays that was published by New York Review Books as an e-book original. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. His New and Selected Poems: 1962–2012 was published in March 2013. His article in this issue, August 14, 2014, was delivered as a talk at the Manggha Museum of ­Japanese Art and Technology in Kraków earlier this year, when he was presented with the Zbigniew Herbert International Literary Award.


John Terborgh, who has worked in the Peruvian Amazon since 1973, is Research Professor in the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke and Director of its Center for Tropical Conservation. His latest book, co-edited with James A. Estes, is Trophic Cascades: Predators, Prey, and the Changing Dynamics of Nature.
 (April 2012)

Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas at Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book for general readers is Lake Views: This World and the Universe.