Contents


Genius in Exile

From a High Place: A Life of Arshile Gorky by Matthew Spender

Black Angel: The Life of Arshile Gorky by Nouritza Matossian

High Rollers

Double Down: Reflections on Gambling and Loss by Frederick Barthelme, by Steven Barthelme

Tot Thought

The Scientist in the Crib: Minds, Brains, and How Children Learn by Alison Gopnik, by Andrew N. Meltzoff, by Patricia K. Kuhl

The Myth of the First Three Years: A New Understanding of Early Brain Development and Lifelong Learning by John T. Bruer

The Secret Sharer

Things That Happened commentaries by by Volume 19. Glas New Russian Writing, by Boris Slutsky, edited, translated, and with an introduction and G.S. Smith

Everyday Stalinism: Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times: Soviet Russia in the 1930s by Sheila Fitzpatrick

Philosophy & Monica Lewinsky

An Affair of State: The Investigation, Impeachment, and Trial of President Clinton by Richard A. Posner

The Problematics of Moral and Legal Theory by Richard A. Posner

Contributors

Al Alvarez is the author of Risky Business, a selection of essays, many of which first appeared in The New York Review of Books.

Jerome Bruner is University Professor at New York University. His newest book, Making Stories, appeared in the spring. (September 2003)

Bogdana Carpenter is Professor of Slavic Languages and Literature at the University of Michigan. (April 2006)

John Carpenter is a poet and critic. (April 2006)

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

Benjamin Demott is Mellon Professor of Humanities Emeritus at Amherst. His most recent book is Junk Politics: The Trashing of the American Mind. (May 2005)

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Zbigniew Herbert’s Collected Poems 1956–1998 was published in English in 2007. The poem in this issue was prepared for a Polish edition of Herbert’s uncollected poems edited by Ryszard Krynicki. (June 2013)

Christopher Hitchens (1949–2011) was a British-American journalist and social critic. Known for his confrontational style and contrarian views on a range of social issues, Hitchens was a frequent contributor to The Nation, The Atlantic, The Times Literary Supplement and Vanity Fair. Hitchens recounts his struggle with esophageal cancer in Mortality, which was published in 2012.

Eva Hoffman’s books include Shtetl: The Life and Death of a Small Town and the World of Polish Jews, Exit into History, and The Secret, a novel. (October 2007)

Aileen Kelly is a Fellow of King’s College, Cambridge. Her books include Toward Another Shore: Russian Thinkers Between Necessity and Chance.


David Levering Lewis is Martin Luther King Jr. University Professor of History at Rutgers and the author of a two-volume biography of W.E.B. DuBois, which won a Pulitzer Prize for each volume in 1994 and 2001. (November 2002)

Louis Menand is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English at Harvard. His books include The Marketplace of Ideas, American Studies and The Metaphysical Club.

W.S. Merwin was born in New York City in 1927 and grew up in Union City, New Jersey, and in Scranton, Pennsylvania. From 1949 to 1951 he worked as a tutor in France, Portugal, and Majorca. He has since lived in many parts of the world, most recently on Maui in the Hawaiian Islands. He is the author of many books of poems, prose, and translations and has received both the Pulitzer and the Bollingen Prizes for poetry, among numerous other awards. His new poetry collection is The Moon Before Morning.

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Marie Morgan, author of Chariot of Fire, is a historian of nineteenth-century America who frequently collaborates with Edmund Morgan in writing history. (June 2011)

Joyce Carol Oates is the Roger S. Berlind Professor in the Lewis Arts Center at Princeton. Her newest story ­collection is Lovely, Dark, Deep.


Garry Wills holds the Alonzo L. McDonald Family Chair on the Life and Teachings of Jesus and Their Impact on Culture at Emory.

Michael Wood is the Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. His books include Literature and the Taste of Knowledge and Yeats and Violence