Contents


The Making of Mr. Putin

First Person: An Astonishingly Frank Self-Portrait by Russia's President Vladimir Putin, with Nataliya Gevorkyan, Natalya Timakova, Andrei Kolesnikov, Translated from the Russian by Catherine A. Fitzpatrick. The Russian original, Ot pervovo litsa, is available on the website www.vagrius.com.

The Vatican Regrets

Memory and Reconciliation: The Church and the Faults of the Past for the Doctrine of the Faith, December 1999 by Rev. Christopher Begg, Msgr. Bruno Forte, Rev. Sebastian Karotemprel S.D.B., Msgr. Roland Minnerath, Rev. Thomas Norris, Rev. Rafael Salazar Cárdenas M.Sp.S., Msgr. Anton Strukelj. Issued from the Vatican by Cardinal Ratzinger of the Congregation. Avai

Cookie Pioneers

Something in the Soil by Patricia Nelson Limerick

Texas History Movies text by John Rosenfield Jr., illustrations by Jack Patton

Tea with Okakura

Okakura Tenshin and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston October 23, 1999-March 26, 2000. an exhibition at Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Nagoya, Japan,, Catalog of the exhibition edited by Saeko Yamawaki, by Nobuko Sakamoto, by Makiko Yamada, by Hitomi Sato

The Book of Tea by Kakuzo Okakura

Acquaintance of the Earth

Hard Green: Saving the Environment from the Environmentalists: A Conservative Manifesto by Peter Huber

Natural Capitalism: Creating the Next Industrial Revolution by Paul Hawken, by Amory Lovins, by L. Hunter Lovins

The Never-Ending War

Argument Without End: In Search of Answers to the Vietnam Tragedy by Robert S. McNamara, by James G. Blight, by Robert K. Brigham, by Thomas J. Biersteker, by Herbert Y. Schandler

Reporting Vietnam, Part One: American Journalism 1959-1969; Part Two: American Journalism 1969-1975 two volumes

American Tragedy: Kennedy, Johnson, and the Origins of the Vietnam War by David Kaiser

Guerrilla Diplomacy: The NLF’s Foreign Relations and the Viet Nam War by Robert K. Brigham

Choosing War: The Lost Chance for Peace and the Escalation of War in Vietnam by Fredrik Logevall

Dragon Ascending: Vietnam and the Vietnamese by Henry Kamm

The Secret War Against Hanoi: Kennedy’s and Johnson’s Use of Spies, Saboteurs, and Covert Warriors in North Vietnam by Richard H. Shultz Jr.

In the Jaws of History by Bui Diem, with David Chanoff

A Better War: The Unexamined Victories and Final Tragedy of America’s Last Years in Vietnam by Lewis Sorley

Vietnam, the Necessary War: A Reinterpretation of America’s Most Disastrous Military Conflict by Michael Lind

America’s War in Vietnam: A Short Narrative History by Larry H. Addington

Memories of a Pure Spring by Duong Thu Huong, Translated from the Vietnamese by Nina McPherson, by Phan Huy Duong

Contributors

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author, most recently, of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.
 
(June 2014)

J. M. Coetzee’s novel The Childhood of Jesus was published in March 2013. He is Professor of Literature at the University of Adelaide and in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

P. N. Furbank is the author of nine books, including biographies of Samuel Butler, Italo Svevo, and E.M. Forster.

Jamey Gambrell is a writer on Russian art and culture. She has translated Vladimir Sorokin’s ­three-volume Ice Trilogy and his novel Day of the Oprichnik into English. Among her other translations are works by Marina ­Tsvetaeva and Tatyana Tolstaya.

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He has just published, with Edward Mortimer and Kerem Öktem, Freedom in Diversity: Ten Lessons for Public Policy from Britain, Canada, France, Germany and the United States.


David Gilmour’s books include The Last Leopard: A Life of Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa and The Pursuit of Italy: A 
History of a Land, Its Regions, and Their Peoples.
 (March 2014)

Zbigniew Herbert’s Collected Poems 1956–1998 was published in English in 2007. The poem in this issue was prepared for a Polish edition of Herbert’s uncollected poems edited by Ryszard Krynicki. (June 2013)

Richard Horton is a physician. He edits The Lancet, a weekly medical journal based in London and New York. He is also a visiting professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Alison Lurie is Frederic J. Whiton Professor of American Literature Emerita at Cornell. She is the author of two collections of essays on children’s literature, Don’t Tell the Grownups and Boys and Girls Forever, and the editor of The Oxford Book of Fairy Tales. Her most recent novel is Truth and Consequences.


Bill McKibben is Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, and the author of The End of Nature, Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future, Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet and of the forthcoming Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist.. He is also the founder of 350.org, the global climate campaign that has been actively involved in the fight against natural gas fracking.

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

Louis Menand is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English at Harvard. His books include The Marketplace of Ideas, American Studies and The Metaphysical Club.

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China and was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London.
 (July 2014)

Julian Moynahan is Professor of English Emeritus at Rutgers University. His most recent book is Anglo-Irish: The Literary Imagination in a Hyphenated Culture. (May 2000)

Thomas Powers is the author of The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA (1979), Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the German Bomb (1993), Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda (2002; revised and expanded edition, 2004), and The Confirmation (2000), a novel. He won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1971 and has contributed to The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Nation, The Atlantic, and Rolling Stone. His latest book, The Killing of Crazy Horse, won the 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. He is currently writing a memoir of his father, who once told him that the last time he met Clare Boothe Luce was in the office of Allen Dulles.


Mary Robinson is the former President of Ireland and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. (May 2000)

Cathleen Schine is the author of several novels, including Rameau’s Niece, The Love Letter, She is Me, The New Yorkers, and The Three Weissmanns of Westport. Her latest novel, Fin & Lady, was published in July 2013. She is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books.

Robert Skidelsky is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at Warwick University, England. His latest book is How Much Is Enough?: Money and the Good Life with Edward Skidelsky. He is the author of a three-volume biography of John Maynard Keynes.
 (April 2014)

Tatyana Tolstaya was born in Leningrad in 1951 to an aristocratic family that includes the writers Leo and Alexei Tolstoy. After completing a degree in classics at Leningrad State University, Tolstaya worked for several years at a Moscow publishing house. In the mid-1980s, she began publishing short stories in literary magazines and her first story collection established her as one of the foremost writers of the Gorbachev era. She spent much of the late Eighties and Nineties living in the United States and teaching at several universities. Known for her acerbic essays on contemporary Russian life, Tolstaya has also been the co-host of the Russian cultural interview television program School for Scandal. Both her novel, The Slynx and her collection of stories, White Walls, are published by NYRB Classics.

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. His new book, Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare’s Time, will be published in the summer 2014.