Are the Troubles Over?

Lost Lives: The Stories of the Men, Women and Children Who Died as a Result of the Northern Ireland Troubles Square by David McKittrick and Seamus Kelters and Brian Feeney and Chris Thornton

Ireland North and South: Perspectives from Social Science edited by Anthony F. Heath, edited by Richard Breen, edited by Christopher T. Whelan

The Trouble with Guns: Republican Strategy and the Provisional IRA by Malachi O'Doherty

Those Are Real Bullets, Aren’t They? Bloody Sunday, Derry, 30 January 1972 by Peter Pringle and Philip Jacobson

Northern Ireland’s Troubles: The Human Costs by Marie-Therese Fay and Mike Morrissey and Marie Smyth

The Master Builders

Wren’s “Tracts” on Architecture and Other Writings by Lydia M. Soo

The City Churches of Sir Christopher Wren by Paul Jeffery

Inigo Jones by John Summerson and Sir Howard Colvin

Sir John Vanbrugh and Landscape Architecture in Baroque England 1690-1730 edited by Christopher Ridgway, edited by Robert Williams

Hawksmoor’s London Churches: Architecture and Theology by Pierre de la Ruffinière du Prey

The Other Revolution

Joyous Greetings: The First International Women’s Movement, 1830-1860 by Bonnie S. Anderson

Not For Ourselves Alone: The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony by Geoffrey C. Ward. based on the documentary film by Ken Burns and Paul Barnes

Not For Ourselves Alone:The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony by Ken Burns and Paul Barnes


John Ashbery is the author of several books of poetry, including Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror (1975), which received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the National Book Award. His first collection, Some Trees (1956), was selected by W. H. Auden for the Yale Younger Poets Series. He has also published art criticism, plays, and a novel. From 1990 until 2008 Ashbery was the Charles P. Stevenson, Jr. Professor of Languages and Literature at Bard College. Ashbery’s new collection of poems, Breezeway, will be ­published in May 2015.

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at ­Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His forthcoming book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His writing and other work can be found at

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. His latest book is Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.

Thomas Flanagan (1923–2002), the grandson of Irish immigrants, grew up in Greenwich, Connecticut, where he ran the school newspaper with his friend Truman Capote. Flanagan attended Amherst College (with a two-year hiatus to serve in the Pacific Fleet) and earned his Ph.D. from Columbia University, where he studied under Lionel Trilling while also writing stories for Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. In 1959, he published an important scholarly work, The Irish Novelists, 1800 to 1850, and the next year he moved to Berkeley, where he was to teach English and Irish literature at the University of California for many years. In 1978 he took up a post at the State University of New York at Stonybrook, from which he retired in 1996. Flanagan and his wife Jean made annual trips to Ireland, where he struck up friendships with many writers, including Benedict Kiely and Seamus Heaney, whom he in turn helped bring to the United States. His intimate knowledge of Ireland’s history and literature also helped to inspire his trilogy of historical novels, starting with The Year of the French (1979, winner of the National Critics’ Circle award for fiction, reissued by NYRB Classics in 2004) and continuing with The Tenants of Time (1988) and The End of the Hunt (1994). He is also the author of There You Are: Writings on Irish and American Literature and History (2004). Flanagan was a frequent contributor to many publications, including The New York Review of Books, The New York Times, and The Kenyon Review.

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. He is the author of several books, including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, and The Global Soul. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and other publications and his most recent book is The Man Within My Head.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Fintan O’Toole is Literary Editor of The Irish Times and ­Leonard L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton. His latest book is A History of Ireland in 100 Objects. (October 2015)

Elaine Scarry is the author of On Beauty and Being Just and recently received the Truman Capote Prize for Dreaming by the Book. She teaches at Harvard, where she is completing a project on war and the social contract. (October 2000)

Robert M. Solow, Institute Professor Emeritus of Economics at MIT, won the 1987 Nobel Prize in economics. His most recent book is Work and Welfare. (May 2009)

Ronald Steel is Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern California, a recent fellow at the American Academy in Berlin, and the author of biographies of Walter Lippmann and Robert Kennedy.

Robert Stone was born in Brooklyn in 1937. He is the author of seven novels: A Hall of Mirrors, the National Book Award–winning Dog Soldiers, A Flag for Sunrise, Children of Light, Outerbridge Reach, Damascus Gate, and Bay of Souls. He has also written short stories, essays, and screenplays, and published a short story collection, Bear and His Daughter, which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. He lives in New York City and in Key West, Florida.