Contents


Kosovo: Was It Worth It?

Kosovo: War and Revenge by Tim Judah

Winning Ugly: NATO’s War to Save Kosovo by Ivo H Daalder, by Michael E. O'Hanlon

Virtual War: Kosovo and Beyond by Michael Ignatieff

Kosovo House of Commons. Foreign Affairs Committee, London: Stationery Office

The Crisis in Kosovo 1989-1999 by Marc Weller

Kosovo: Contending Voices on Balkan Interventions by William J. Buckley

The Story of Everything

One World Divisible: A Global History since 1945 by David Reynolds

Twentieth Century: The History of the World, 1901 to 2000 by J.M. Roberts

How Not to Deal with Bullies

The Greatest Threat: Iraq, Weapons of Mass Destruction, and the Crisis of Global Security by Richard Butler

The Sanctions Decade: Assessing UN Strategies in the 1990s by David Cortright, by George A. Lopez

We The Peoples: The Role of the United Nations in the Twenty-first Century Report of the Secretary-General

Apocalypse Now

Die Fahrt im Einbaum oder Das Stück zum Film vom Krieg[The Journey in the Dugout Canoe, or The Piece about the Film about the War] by Peter Handke

Unter Tränen fragend[Questioning Through Tears] by Peter Handke

My Year in the No-Man’s-Bay by Peter Handke, Translated from the German by Krishna Winston

A Journey to the Rivers: Justice for Serbia by Peter Handke, Translated from the German by Scott Abbott

A Sorrow Beyond Dreams by Peter Handke, Translated from the German by Ralph Manheim

Repetition by Peter Handke, Translated from the German by Ralph Manheim

Plays: 1 by Peter Handke, Translated from the German by Michael Roloff, with an introduction by Tom Kuhn

Abschied des Träumers vom Neunten Land[The Dreamer’s Farewell to the Ninth Country] by Peter Handke

Sommerlicher Nachtrag zu einer winterlichen Reise[Summer Afterword to a Winter Journey] by Peter Handke

Der Himmel über Berlin: Ein Filmbuch[released in America as “Wings of Desire”] by Wim Wenders, by Peter Handke

Noch einmal vom Neunten Land[One More Time from the Ninth Country] by Peter Handke, by Joze Horvat

On a Dark Night I Left My Silent House by Peter Handke, Translated from the German by Krishna Winston

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Whitney Balliett’s most recent book is Collected Works: A Journal of Jazz, 1954—2001 (August 2003).

Mark Danner is the author, most recently, of Stripping Bare the Body: Politics Violence War. He is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the ­Humanities at Bard. His writing and other work can be found at markdanner.com.

Benjamin Demott is Mellon Professor of Humanities Emeritus at Amherst. His most recent book is Junk Politics: The Trashing of the American Mind. (May 2005)

Rosemary Dinnage’s books include The Ruffian on the Stair, One to One: Experiences of Psychotherapy, and Annie Besant.

Viktor Erofeyev is the author of Russian Beauty, a novel, and the editor of The Penguin Book of New Russian Writing. He lives in Moscow. (March 2001)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He has just published, with Edward Mortimer and Kerem Öktem, Freedom in Diversity: Ten Lessons for Public Policy from Britain, Canada, France, Germany and the United States.


Jasper Griffin is Emeritus Professor of Classical Literature and a Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. His books include Homer on Life and Death.

Christopher Hitchens (1949–2011) was a British-American journalist and social critic. Known for his confrontational style and contrarian views on a range of social issues, Hitchens was a frequent contributor to The Nation, The Atlantic, The Times Literary Supplement and Vanity Fair. Hitchens recounts his struggle with esophageal cancer in Mortality, which was published in 2012.

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Bernard Knox (1914–2010) was an English classicist. He was the first director of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Among his many books are The Heroic Temper, The Oldest Dead White European Males, and Backing into the Future: The Classical Tradition and Its Renewal. He is the editor of The Norton Book of Classical Literature and wrote the introductions and notes for Robert Fagles’s translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

J. S. Marcus’s most recent novel is The Captain’s Fire. He is currently a fellow at the Santa Maddalena Foundation, near Florence. (April 2001)

Avishai Margalit is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is the winner of the 2012 Philosophical Book Award (Hanover) for his most recent book, On Compromise and Rotten Compromises. He is currently Edwin Heafey Jr. Visiting Professor at Stanford.


Daniel Mendelsohn, a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author, most recently, of Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture. He teaches at Bard.


Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China and was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London.
 (July 2014)

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Tim Parks, a novelist, essayist, and translator, is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. He has recently published the novel Sex Is Forbidden and the travel book Italian Ways: On and Off the Rails from Milan to Palermo.


Robin Robertson is from the northeast coast of Scotland. His fifth collection of poetry will be published next year. (June 2012)

Israel Rosenfield and Edward B. Ziff’s most recent book is DNA: A Graphic Guide to the Molecule That Shook the World. They are completing a book about the brain. Rosenfield is also completing a graphic novel illustrated by Fiammetta Ghedini. (June 2012)

Luc Sante is the author of Low Life, Evidence, The Factory of Facts, Kill All Your Darlings, and Folk Photography. He has translated Félix Fénéon’s Novels in Three Lines and written the introduction to George Simenon’s The Man Who Watched Trains Go By (both available as NYRB Classics). He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard College.

Elaine Scarry is the author of On Beauty and Being Just and recently received the Truman Capote Prize for Dreaming by the Book. She teaches at Harvard, where she is completing a project on war and the social contract. (October 2000)

A. O. Scott is a film critic at The New York Times and the former Sunday book critic for Newsday. His writing has appeared in The New York Review of Books, Slate, and many other publications.

Tom Stoppard’s most recent play, The Invention of Love, will have its first American productions in January at the American Conservatory Theater, San Francisco, and in February at the Wilma Theater, Philadelphia. (September 1999)

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life. His article in this issue draws on his essay in Tyringham Topics.
 (February 2013)