Contents


Space Men

Paths to the Absolute: Mondrian, Malevich, Kandinsky, Pollock, Newman, Rothko, and Still John Golding

Founding Father

My Six Years with Gorbachev Anatoly S. Chernyaev, translated from the Russian and edited by Robert D. English and Elizabeth Tucker

A Tale of Two Cardinals

Selected Works of Joseph Cardinal Bernardin edited by Alphonse P. Spilly, C.PP.S.

Cardinal Ratzinger: The Vatican’s Enforcer of the Faith John L. Allen Jr.

The Spirit of the Liturgy Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, translated from the German by John Saward

Liberated Women

George Sand: A Woman’s Life Writ Large Belinda Jack

The Life of Marie d’Agoult, Alias Daniel Stern Phyllis Stock-Morton

Marie d’Agoult: The Rebel Countess Richard Bolster

Borges and His Ghosts

Selected Non-Fictions Jorge Luis Borges, edited by Eliot Weinberger, translated by Esther Allen, Suzanne Jill Levine, and Eliot Weinberger

Contributors

Kwame Anthony Appiah teaches philosophy at Princeton. His latest book is The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen.

 (November 2012)

John Ashbery is the author of several books of poetry, including Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror (1975), which received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the National Book Award. His first collection, Some Trees (1956), was selected by W. H. Auden for the Yale Younger Poets Series. He has also published art criticism, plays, and a novel. From 1990 until 2008 Ashbery was the Charles P. Stevenson, Jr. Professor of Languages and Literature at Bard College. Ashbery’s most recent collection of poetry is Quick Question. His Collected French Translations will be published in April 2014 in two volumes, one of Prose and one of Poetry.

Robert Cottrell has served as a Moscow bureau chief for both The Economist and the Financial Times. (June 2007)

David Coward is Research Professor in French at Leeds University, and is completing a history of French literature. His translation of Albert Cohen’s Belle du Seigneur won the Scott-Moncrieff Prize in 1996. (April 2001)

Robert Darnton is Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and University Librarian at Harvard. 
His forthcoming book is Censors at Work: How States Shaped Literature.

Jack Flam is Distinguished Professor of Art History at Brooklyn College and at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His new book, Matisse and Picasso: The Story of Their Rivalry and Friendship, has just been published. (March 2003)

Jasper Griffin is Emeritus Professor of Classical Literature and a Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. His books include Homer on Life and Death.

Ryszard Kapuscinski lives in Warsaw. The essay in this issue appears in The Shadow of the Sun, which is being published this month by Knopf. (April 2001)

George F. Kennan (1904–2005) was an American diplomat, political scientist and historian. He is best known for his role in shaping US foreign policy during the Cold War and, in particular, for the doctrine of containment. Kennan was Professor Emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton and served as Ambassador to the USSR in 1952 and as Ambassador to Yugoslavia from 1961 to 1963. His books include At a Century’s Ending and An American Family.

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Louis Menand is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English at Harvard. His books include The Marketplace of Ideas, American Studies and The Metaphysical Club.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Andrew O’Hagan’s new novel, The Illuminations, will be published early next year. (October 2014)

Tim Parks, a novelist, essayist, and translator, is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. He has recently published the novel Sex Is Forbidden and the travel book Italian Ways: On and Off the Rails from Milan to Palermo.


Oliver Sacks is a physician and the author of ten books, the most recent of which is Hallucinations. He is a professor of ­neurology at NYU School of Medicine and a visiting professor at the University of Warwick.


Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life. His article in this issue draws on his essay in Tyringham Topics.
 (February 2013)

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. His new book, Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare’s Time, will be published in the summer 2014.