Contents


A World Gone Up in Smoke

New and Collected Poems, 1931–2001 by Czeslaw Milosz

To Begin Where I Am: Selected Essays by Czeslaw Milosz, edited and with an introduction by Bogdana Carpenter and Madeline G. Levine

An Anarchist’s Art

Signac, 1863–1935 catalog of the exhibition by Marina Ferretti-Bocquillon, Anne Distel, John Leighton, and Susan Alyson Stein

Signac: Catalogue raisonné de l’oeuvre peint by Françoise Cachin, with Marina Ferretti-Bocquillon

Signac et la libération de la couleur: De Matisse à Mondrian edited by Erich Franz

Golden Notebooks

The Complete Sagas of Icelanders edited by Vidar Hreinsson

The Sagas of Icelanders: A Selection with a preface by Jane Smiley and an introduction by Robert Kellogg

Dupe of History

Embers by Sándor Márai,translated by Carol Brown Janeway

Das Vermächtnis der Eszter(Eszter’s Legacy) by Sándor Márai,translated by Christina Viragh

Bekenntnisse eines Bürgers: Erinnerungen (Confessions of a Bourgeois: A Memoir) by Sándor Márai, translated by Hans Skirecki

Land, Land! Erinnerungen(Land, Land: A Memoir) by Sándor Márai, translated by Hans Skirecki

Memoir of Hungary, 1944–1948 by Sándor Márai, translated by Albert Tezla

Der Wind kommt vom Westen: Amerikanische Reisebilder(The Wind Comes from the West) by Sándor Márai, translated by Artur Saternus

The Hardest War

With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa by E.B. Sledge

The Soldiers’ Tale: Bearing Witness to Modern War by Samuel Hynes

The Battle of Okinawa: The Blood and the Bomb by George Feifer

Mad About the Book

Patience and Fortitude: A Roving Chronicle of Book People, Book Places, and Book Culture by Nicholas A. Basbanes

A Gentle Madness: Bibliophiles, Bibliomanes, and the Eternal Passion for Books by Nicholas A. Basbanes

From Florence to Las Vegas

Virtue and Beauty: Leonardo’s ‘Ginevra de’ Benci’ and Renaissance Portraits of Women Catalog of the exhibition edited by David Alan Brown

Aelbert Cuyp Catalog of the exhibition edited by Arthur K. Wheelock Jr.

The Art of the Motorcycle Catalog of the exhibition published by the Guggenheim Las Vegas

Masterpieces and Master Collectors Catalog of the exhibition published by the Guggenheim Hermitage Museum

Mean Streets

The Gangs of New York: An Informal History of the Underworld by Herbert Asbury, with a foreword by Jorge Luis Borges

Who Should Get In? Part II

Legacies: The Story of the Immigrant Second Generation by Alejandro Portes and Rubén G. Rumbaut

The Handbook of International Migration: The American Experience edited by Charles Hirschman, Philip Kasinitz, and Josh DeWind

Strangers Among Us: Latino Lives in a Changing America by Roberto Suro

Heaven’s Door: Immigration Policy and the American Economy by George J. Borjas

Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities by Mary C. Waters

The New Americans: Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration edited by James P. Smith and Barry Edmonston

The Case Against Immigration by Roy Beck

The Congressional Politics of Immigration Reform by James G. Gimpel and James R. Edwards Jr

Contributors

Daniel Benjamin is a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. He served on the National Security Council staff between 1994 and 1999. Daniel Benjamin and Steven Simon’s book on religously motivated terrorism will be published next year. (December 2001)

J. M. Coetzee’s novel The Childhood of Jesus was published in March 2013. He is Professor of Literature at the University of Adelaide and in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

John Gregory Dunne (1932–2003) was a novelist, screenwriter and critic. His final novel is entitled Nothing Lost.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Thomas Flanagan (1923–2002), the grandson of Irish immigrants, grew up in Greenwich, Connecticut, where he ran the school newspaper with his friend Truman Capote. Flanagan attended Amherst College (with a two-year hiatus to serve in the Pacific Fleet) and earned his Ph.D. from Columbia University, where he studied under Lionel Trilling while also writing stories for Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. In 1959, he published an important scholarly work, The Irish Novelists, 1800 to 1850, and the next year he moved to Berkeley, where he was to teach English and Irish literature at the University of California for many years. In 1978 he took up a post at the State University of New York at Stonybrook, from which he retired in 1996. Flanagan and his wife Jean made annual trips to Ireland, where he struck up friendships with many writers, including Benedict Kiely and Seamus Heaney, whom he in turn helped bring to the United States. His intimate knowledge of Ireland’s history and literature also helped to inspire his trilogy of historical novels, starting with The Year of the French (1979, winner of the National Critics’ Circle award for fiction) and continuing with The Tenants of Time (1988) and The End of the Hunt (1994). Flanagan was a frequent contributor to many publications, including The New York Review of Books, The New York Times, and The Kenyon Review. A collection of his essays, There You Are: Writing on Irish and American Literature and History, is also published by New York Review Books.

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He has just published, with Edward Mortimer and Kerem Öktem, Freedom in Diversity: Ten Lessons for Public Policy from Britain, Canada, France, Germany and the United States.


Robert L. Herbert, after a long career at Yale, is now Andrew W. Mellon Professor Emeritus of Humanities at Mount Holyoke. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, and has been named Officier dans l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Government. Among his books are Impressionism: Art, Leisure and Parisian Society, Nature’s Workshop: Renoir’s Writings on the Decorative Arts, and Seurat: Drawings and Paintings. His most recent book is Seurat and the Making of La Grande Jatte.

Charles Hope was Director of the Warburg Institute, London, from 2001 to 2010. He is the author of Titian.


Christopher Jencks is the Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy at Harvard. He is the author of Rethinking Social Policy, among several other books. (October 2014)

Tim Judah is a correspondent for The Economist. For The New York Review he has reported from, among other places, Afghanistan, Serbia, Uganda, and Armenia.

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Joseph Lelyveld is a former correspondent and Editor of The New York Times. His latest book is Great Soul: Mahatma Gandhi and His Struggle with India. (September 2014)

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

William H. McNeill is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Chicago. His most recent books are The Pursuit of Truth: A Historian’s Memoir and Summers Long Ago: On Grandfather’s Farm and in Grandmother’s Kitchen, published by the Berkshire Publishing Group. His most recent publication, as editor, is the second edition of the Encyclopedia of World History.

Matthew Meselson is Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of Natural Sciences at Harvard. He is engaged in research on molecular genetics and evolution. (December 2001)

Czeslaw Milosz (1911–2004) was born in Szetejnie, Lithuania. Over the course of his long and prolific career he published works in many genres, including criticism (The Captive Mind), fiction (The Issa Valley), memoir (Native Realm), and poetry (New and Collected Poems, 1931-2001). He was a member of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1980.

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China and was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London.
 (July 2014)

Tim Parks, a novelist, essayist, and translator, is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. He has recently published the novel Sex Is Forbidden and the travel book Italian Ways: On and Off the Rails from Milan to Palermo.


Charles Rosen is a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Luc Sante is the author of Low Life, Evidence, The Factory of Facts, Kill All Your Darlings, and Folk Photography. He has translated Félix Fénéon’s Novels in Three Lines and written the introduction to George Simenon’s The Man Who Watched Trains Go By (both available as NYRB Classics). He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard College.

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He has published some twenty collections of poetry, six books of essays, a memoir, and numerous translations. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Simic’s recent works include Voice at 3 a.m., a selection of later and new poems; Master of Disguises, new poems; and Confessions of a Poet Laureate, a collection of short essays that was published by New York Review Books as an e-book original. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. His New and Selected Poems: 1962–2012 was published in March 2013. His article in this issue, August 14, 2014, was delivered as a talk at the Manggha Museum of ­Japanese Art and Technology in Kraków earlier this year, when he was presented with the Zbigniew Herbert International Literary Award.


Steven Simon is assistant director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London. He served on the National Security Council staff between 1994 and 1999. Steven Simon and Daniel Benjamin’s book on religously motivated terrorism will be published next year. (December 2001)

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life. His article in this issue draws on his essay in Tyringham Topics.
 (February 2013)