Contents


The Greatest Generation

Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation Joseph J. Ellis

The Creation of America: Through Revolution to Empire Francis Jennings

Parlor Politics: In Which the Ladies of Washington Help Build a City and a Government Catherine Allgor

The Story of a Room

The Gubbio Studiolo and Its Conservation:Vol. 1: Federico da Montefeltro’s Palace at Gubbio and Its Studiolo Olga Raggio

The Gubbio Studiolo and Its Conservation: Vol. 2: Italian Renaissance Intarsia and the Conservation of the Gubbio Studiolo Antoine M. Wilmering

Contributors

Neal Ascherson is the author of The Struggles for Poland, The Black Sea, and Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.


John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of many novels, including The Book of Evidence, The Untouchable, Eclipse, The Sea (winner of the Man Booker Prize), and Ancient Light. His latest novel ­The Blue Guitar was published in September 2015. As Benjamin Black he has written six crime novels, including Vengeance.

Daniel Barenboim is General Music Director of the Berlin Staatsoper and its orchestra. He is Music Director of the Teatro alla Scala and cofounder of the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra. (June 2013)

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Ian Buruma is the author of The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013), and Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the Shadows of War (2014), winner of the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications.

Viktor Erofeyev is the author of Russian Beauty, a novel, and the editor of The Penguin Book of New Russian Writing. He lives in Moscow. (March 2001)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. His latest book is Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.


David Hajdu, author of Lush Life and Positively 4th Street, teaches at Syracuse University and is music critic for The New Republic. (June 2005)

Michael Ignatieff is the Edward R. Murrow Professor of ­Practice at the Harvard Kennedy School and the author of Fire and Ashes: Success and Failure in Politics.
 (June 2015)

Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

Daniel Mendelsohn was born in 1960 and studied classics at the University of Virginia and at Princeton, where he received his doctorate. His essays and reviews appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review. His books include The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; and the collection Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture, published by New York Review Books. He teaches at Bard College. His essay in the September 25, 2014 issue will appear as the introduction to a new translation of The Bacchae by Robin Robertson, to be published in September by Ecco.

Oliver Sacks is a physician and the author of over ten books, the most recent of which is On the Move: A Life. He is a professor of ­neurology at NYU School of Medicine and a visiting professor at the University of Warwick.


Paul Seabright is leaving the University of Cambridge, where he was Reader in Economics, to teach economics at the University of Toulouse. (March 2001)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown. In honor of the 250th ­anniversary of the Stamp Act, his two edited volumes of The American Revolution: Writings from the Pamphlet Debate, 1764–1776 will be published this summer, 2015.