Contents


Camera Work

Vermeer and the Delft School Catalog of the exhibition by Walter Liedtke, with Michiel C. Plomp and Axel Rüger.

Vermeer’s Camera: Uncovering the Truth Behind the Masterpieces Philip Steadman

Vermeer: A View of Delft Anthony Bailey

A Lament in Three Voices’

A Treatise on Poetry Czeslaw Milosz, translated from the Polish by the author and Robert Hass

Milosz’s ABC’s Czeslaw Milosz, translated from the Polish by Madeline Levine

The Price of Honor

The Shaping of Southern Culture: Honor, Grace, and War, 1760s–1880s Bertram Wyatt-Brown

Southern Honor: Ethics and Behavior in the Old South Bertram Wyatt-Brown

Honor and Slavery Kenneth S. Greenberg

A Betting Man

Bells Are Ringing music by Jule Styne, book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, directed by Tina Landau, and starring Faith Prince

Heroes and Victims

Neighbors: The Destruction of the Jewish Community in Jedwabne, Poland Jan T. Gross

The Fragility of Goodness: Why Bulgaria’s Jews Survived the Holocaust Tzvetan Todorov, translated from the French by Arthur Denner

The Jehovah’s Witnesses and the Nazis: Persecution, Deportation, and Murder, 1933–1945 Michel Reynaud and Sylvie Graffard, translated from the French by James A. Moorhouse, with an introduction by Michael Berenbaum

Contributors

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book is a ­collection of essays from these pages, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the ­Shadows of War. His book Year Zero: A History of 1945 is now out in paperback.

István Deák is Seth Low Professor Emeritus at Columbia. He is the author, with Jan Gross and Tony Judt, of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath.

Helen Epstein is a writer specializing in public health and an adjunct professor at Bard College. She has advised numerous organizations, including the United States Agency for International Development, the World Bank, Human Rights Watch, and UNICEF. She is the author of The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight Against AIDS in Africa and has contributed articles to many publications, including The New York Review of Books and The New York Times Magazine. Research for her article in the December 18, 2014 issue was supported by a grant from the Investigative Fund at 
the Nation Institute.

Christopher Hitchens (1949–2011) was a British-American journalist and social critic. Known for his confrontational style and contrarian views on a range of social issues, Hitchens was a frequent contributor to The Nation, The Atlantic, The Times Literary Supplement and Vanity Fair. Hitchens recounts his struggle with esophageal cancer in Mortality, which was published in 2012.

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Masha Lipman is the former Deputy Editor of the Russian news magazine Itogi. (May 2001)

Jeff Madrick is Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz ­Rediscovery Government Initiative at the Century Foundation, Editor of Challenge Magazine, and teaches at the Cooper Union. His latest book is Seven Bad Ideas: How Mainstream Econ­omists Damaged America and the World.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.