Contents


The Performer

Theodore Rex by Edmund Morris

Theodore Roosevelt by Louis Auchincloss

The Selected Letters of Theodore Roosevelt edited by H.W. Brands

The Blood Lust of Identity

In the Name of Identity: Violence and the Need to Belong by Amin Maalouf, translated from the French by Barbara Bray

Irish on the Inside: In Search of the Soul of Irish America by Tom Hayden

The Master of the Blur

Gerhard Richter: Forty Years of Painting Catalog of the exhibition by Robert Storr

Gerhard Richter: October 18, 1977 by Robert Storr

The Daily Practice of Painting by Gerhard Richter

Party Line

Economic Report of the President together with The Annual Report of the Council of Economic Advisers by The Council Of Economic Advisors

Nudes Without Desire

Earthly Bodies: Irving Penn’s Nudes, 1949–50 Catalog of the exhibition by Maria Morris Hambourg

Dancer: Photographs of Alexandra Beller by Irving Penn Catalog of the exhibition with an introduction by Anne Wilkes Tucker and an essay by Sylvia Wolf

The Poet’s Eye

George Romney, 1734–1802 Catalog of the exhibition by Alex Kidson

Those Delightful Regions of Imagination: Essays on George Romney edited by Alex Kidson

A Family Affair

The Brother: The Untold Story of Atomic Spy David Greenglass and How He Sent His Sister, Ethel Rosenberg, to the Electric Chair by Sam Roberts

The Man Behind the Rosenbergs by Alexander Feklisov and Sergei Kostin

Divine, Superfluous Beauty

The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers edited by Tim Hunt

The Collected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers,Volume Five: Textual Evidence and Commentary edited by Tim Hunt

Too Many Choices?

The Other Boston Busing Story: What’s Won and Lost Across the Boundary Line by Susan E. Eaton

Kingdom of Children: Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement by Mitchell L. Stevens

Surviving for Art

The Author of Himself: The Life of Marcel Reich-Ranicki by Marcel Reich-Ranicki, translated from the German by Ewald Osers

The Hard Hitter

The Complete Works of Isaac Babel edited by Nathalie Babel, translated from the Russian by Peter Constantine, with an introduction by Cynthia Ozick

How Are Women Doing?

Beggars and Choosers: How the Politics of Choice Shapes Adoption, Abortion, and Welfare in the United States by Rickie Solinger

Roe v. Wade: The Abortion Rights Controversy in American History by N.E.H. Hull and Peter Charles Hoffer

Out of Wedlock: Causes and Consequences of Nonmarital Fertility edited by Lawrence L. Wu and Barbara Wolfe

The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism Is Harming Our Young Men by Christina Hoff Sommers

The Frailty Myth: Redefining the Physical Potential of Women and Girls by Colette Dowling

Contributors

Kwame Anthony Appiah teaches philosophy at Princeton. His latest book is The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen.

 (November 2012)

Neal Ascherson is the author of The Struggles for Poland, The Black Sea, and Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.


Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications.

Christian Caryl is a Senior Fellow at the Legatum Institute and the editor of Foreign Policy’s Democracy Lab website. His latest book is Strange Rebels: 1979 and the Birth of the 21st Century.

Jared Diamond, Professor of Geography and Physiology at UCLA, is the author most recently of Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed. (June 2012)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Michael Frayn is a playwright and novelist. His new novel, Spies, will be published in April. (March 2002)

Howard Gardner teaches psychology at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His most recent book, with Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and William Damon, is Good Work: When Excellence and Ethics Meet. (April 2002)

Andrew Hacker teaches political science at Queens College. He is currently working on a book on mathematics. 
 (January 2014)

Peter Holland holds the McMeel Family Chair in Shakespeare Studies in the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre at the University of Notre Dame. He wrote the entry on Shakespeare in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. (December 2004)

John Lanchester is the author of five books including, most recently, I.O.U.: Why Everyone Owes Everyone and No One Can Pay. In 2008 he received the E.M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.
 (December 2011)

Perry Link is Chancellorial Chair for Teaching Across Disciplines at the University of California at Riverside. He translated China’s Charter 08 manifesto, published in these pages, and recently 
co-edited No Enemies, No Hatred, a collection of essays and poems by Liu Xiaobo. His latest book isAn Anatomy of Chinese: Rhythm, Metaphor, Politics and he is finishing a translation of the autobiography of the Chinese dissident astrophysicist Fang Lizhi.

Janet Malcolm was born in Prague. She was educated at the High School of Music and Art, in New York, and at the University of Michigan. Along with In the Freud Archives, her books include Diana and Nikon: Essays on Photography, Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession, The Journalist and the Murderer, The Purloined Clinic: Selected Writings, The Silent Woman: Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, The Crime of Sheila McGough, and Reading Chekhov: A Critical Journey. She wrote about the trial of Mazoltuv Borukhova, the mother of Michelle, in her book Iphigenia in Forest Hills, just out in paperback. Her collection Forty-One False Starts: Essays on Artists and Writers will be published in the spring of 2013.


She lives in New York.

Daniel Mendelsohn was born in 1960 and studied classics at the University of Virginia and at Princeton, where he received his doctorate. His essays and reviews appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review. His books include The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; and the collection Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture, published by New York Review Books. He teaches at Bard College. His essay in the September 25, 2014 issue will appear as the introduction to a new translation of The Bacchae by Robin Robertson, to be published in September by Ecco.

Thomas Nagel is University Professor Emeritus at NYU. His latest book is Mind and Cosmos. (November 2013)

Fintan O’Toole is Literary Editor of The Irish Times and Leonard L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton. His latest book is A History of Ireland in 100 Objects. (December 2013)

Thomas Powers is the author of The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA (1979), Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the German Bomb (1993), Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda (2002; revised and expanded edition, 2004), and The Confirmation (2000), a novel. He won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1971 and has contributed to The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Nation, The Atlantic, and Rolling Stone. His latest book, The Killing of Crazy Horse, won the 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. He is currently writing a memoir of his father, who once told him that the last time he met Clare Boothe Luce was in the office of Allen Dulles.


Sanford Schwartz’s reviews have been collected in The Art Presence and Artists and Writers. (August 2014)

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He has published some twenty collections of poetry, six books of essays, a memoir, and numerous translations. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Simic’s recent works include Voice at 3 a.m., a selection of later and new poems; Master of Disguises, new poems; and Confessions of a Poet Laureate, a collection of short essays that was published by New York Review Books as an e-book original. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. His New and Selected Poems: 1962–2012 was published in March 2013. His article in this issue, August 14, 2014, was delivered as a talk at the Manggha Museum of ­Japanese Art and Technology in Kraków earlier this year, when he was presented with the Zbigniew Herbert International Literary Award.


Robert M. Solow, Institute Professor Emeritus of Economics at MIT, won the 1987 Nobel Prize in economics. His most recent book is Work and Welfare. (May 2009)

Sam Tanenhaus is the editor of The New York Times Book Review and the author of The Death of Conservatism.
 (May 2012)