Contents


The Bishops at Bay

Betrayal: The Crisis in the Catholic Church by the Investigative Staff of the Boston Globe

Conclave: The Politics, Personalities, and Process of the Next Papal Election by John L. Allen Jr.

Gardening with Attitude

We Made a Garden by Margery Fish,with a foreword by Graham Stuart Thomas

Green Thoughts: A Writer in the Garden by Eleanor Perényi, with an introduction by Allen Lacey

The Gardener’s Year by Karel Capek, with an introduction by Verlyn Klinkenborg

My Summer in a Garden by Charles Dudley Warner, with an introduction by Allan Gurganus

The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World by Michael Pollan

An Island Garden by Celia Thaxter, illustrated by Childe Hassam, with an introduction by Tasha Tudor

Murder in India

We Have No Orders to Save You’: State Participation and Complicity in Communal Violence in Gujarat a report by Human Rights Watch

He Took Manhattan

Somewhere for Me: A Biography of Richard Rodgers by Meryle Secrest

Lorenz Hart: A Poet on Broadway by Frederick Nolan

Making a Fetish of Mystery

Essay on Exoticism: An Aesthetics of Diversity by Victor Segalen, translated and edited by Yaël Rachel Schlick, with a foreword by Harry Harootunian

Contributors

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book is a ­collection of essays from these pages, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the ­Shadows of War. His book Year Zero: A History of 1945 is now out in paperback.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier ­Professor of Political Economy at Harvard. His books include The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth and Day of Reckoning: The Consequences of American Economic Policy Under Reagan and After.
 (October 2014)

David Hajdu, author of Lush Life and Positively 4th Street, teaches at Syracuse University and is music critic for The New Republic. (June 2005)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Kenneth Koch (1925–2002) was Professor of English at Columbia. During his lifetime, Koch published at least thirty volumes of poetry and plays. He was also the author of a novel, The Red Robins; two books on teaching poetry writing to children, Wishes, Lies, and Dreams and Rose, Where Did You Get That Red?; and I Never Told Anybody: Teaching Poetry Writing in a Nursing Home.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Joyce Carol Oates is the Roger S. Berlind Professor in the Lewis Arts Center at Princeton. Her newest story ­collection is Lovely, Dark, Deep.


Darryl Pinckney, a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author of a novel, High Cotton, and Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature. He has worked for Robert Wilson on various theatrical projects, most recently an adaptation of Daniil Kharms’s The Old Woman.

Sanford Schwartz’s reviews have been collected in The Art Presence and Artists and Writers. (August 2014)

Saul Steinberg died in 1999. Collections of his drawings include All in Line, The Passport, The Labyrinth, The Inspector, and The Discovery of America. The article in this issue is drawn from Reflections and Shadows, a book of interviews with the writer Aldo Buzzi, just published by Random House. (August 2002)

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit: Angstrom, he two of which, Rabbit is Richand Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Garry Wills holds the Alonzo L. McDonald Family Chair on the Life and Teachings of Jesus and Their Impact on Culture at Emory.