Contents


Edward Weston’s Women

Margrethe Mather and Edward Weston: A Passionate Collaboration by Beth Gates Warren

Through Another Lens: My Years with Edward Weston by Charis Wilson and Wendy Madar

Mind Your Maniera

Painting in Renaissance Florence, 1500–1550 by David Franklin

Pontormo, Bronzino, Allori: A Genealogy of Florentine Art by Elizabeth Pilliod

Objects of Virtue: Art in Renaissance Italy by Luke Syson and Dora Thornton

A Battle for Religion

The Star of Redemption by Franz Rosenzweig, translated from the German by William W. Hallo

Philosophical and Theological Writings by Franz Rosenzweig, translated from the German and edited by Paul W. Franks and Michael L. Morgan

Cultural Writings of Franz Rosenzweig edited and translated from the German by Barbara E. Galli, with a foreword by Leora Batnitzky

God, Man, and the World: Lectures and Essays by Franz Rosenzweig, edited and translated from the German by Barbara E. Galli, with a foreword by Michael Oppenheim

Franz Rosenzweig’s “The New Thinking” edited and translated from the German by Alan Udoff and Barbara E. Galli

On Jewish Learning by Franz Rosenzweig, edited by N.N. Glatzer

Rosenzweig and Heidegger: Between Judaism and German Philosophy by Peter Eli Gordon

Understanding the Sick and the Healthy: A View of World, Man, and God by Franz Rosenzweig, translated from the German and with an introduction by Nahum Glatzer, and an introduction by Hilary Putnam

Idolatry and Representation: The Philosophy of Franz Rosenzweig Reconsidered by Leora Batnitzky

On the Psychotheology of Everyday Life: Reflections on Freud and Rosenzweig by Eric L. Santner

Franz Rosenzweig: His Life and Thought by Nahum N. Glatzer, with a foreword by Paul-Mendes Flohr

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications.

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Elizabeth Drew is a regular contributor to The New York Review. Her most recent book, Washington Journal: Reporting Watergate and Richard Nixon’s Downfall, was published in May.

 (September 2014)

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Andrew Hacker teaches political science and mathematics 
at Queens College. His new book, The Math Myth, will appear in the spring. (October 2014)

Anthony Hecht’sCollected Later Poems and Melodies Unheard: Essays on the Mysteries of Poetry were published in 2003. He died on October 20. (December 2004)

Michael Hofmann is a poet and translator. He has translated nine books by Joseph Roth and was awarded the PEN translation prize for String of Pearls. His Selected Poems were published in 2010. He lives in London.

Charles Hope was Director of the Warburg Institute, London, from 2001 to 2010. He is the author of Titian.


Doris Lessing’s books include the novels The Sweetest Dream, Mara and Dann, and Ben, in the World, as well as two volumes of her autobiography, Under My Skin and Walking in the Shade. (April 2003)

Mark Lilla is Professor of the Humanities at Columbia 
and author of The Stillborn God: Politics, Religion, and the Modern West.



Janet Malcolm was born in Prague. She was educated at the High School of Music and Art, in New York, and at the University of Michigan. Along with In the Freud Archives, her books include Diana and Nikon: Essays on Photography, Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession, The Journalist and the Murderer, The Purloined Clinic: Selected Writings, The Silent Woman: Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, The Crime of Sheila McGough, and Reading Chekhov: A Critical Journey. She wrote about the trial of Mazoltuv Borukhova, the mother of Michelle, in her book Iphigenia in Forest Hills, just out in paperback. Her collection Forty-One False Starts: Essays on Artists and Writers will be published in the spring of 2013.


She lives in New York.

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas’s most recent books are The Hidden Life of Dogs, Certain Poor Shepherds, and The Tribe of Tiger: Cats and Their Culture.

Kenneth Maxwell is Director of Latin American Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. His new book, Naked Tropics: Essays on Empire and Other Rogues, will be published this month. (July 2003)

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

Jill Nelson is the author of Volunteer Slavery. Her first novel, Sexual Healing , will be published in June 2003. (December 2002)

William D. Nordhaus is Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale. (March 2012)

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His most recent book is Stolen Glimpses, Captive ­Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012.


Robin Robertson is from the northeast coast of Scotland. His fifth collection of poetry will be published next year. (June 2012)

Joseph Roth died at age forty-five in Paris in 1939. He is the author of The Radetzky March, among many other novels. The article in this issue will appear in What I Saw: Reports from Berlin, 1920– 1933, to be published this month by W.W. Norton. (December 2002)

Garry Wills holds the Alonzo L. McDonald Family Chair on the Life and Teachings of Jesus and Their Impact on Culture at Emory.