Contents


Bitter-Sweet

Private Lives a play by Noël Coward, directed by Howard Davies

Long Island Sound a play by Noël Coward, directed by Scott Alan Evans

Pilgrim’s Progress

Sinclair Lewis: Rebel from Main Street by Richard Lingeman

Sinclair Lewis: An American Life by Mark Schorer

Sinclair Lewis: Arrowsmith, Elmer Gantry, Dodsworth edited by Richard Lingeman

Contributors

Hussein Agha is Senior Associate Member of St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and coauthor of A Framework for a Palestinian National Security Doctrine. (November 2012)

Kwame Anthony Appiah teaches philosophy at Princeton. His latest book is The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen.

 (November 2012)

Ehud Barak was Prime Minister of Israel from May 1999 until December 2000. (June 2002)

Tim Flannery is Chief Commissioner of the Australian Climate Commission. His book Among the Islands: Adventures in the Pacific was published last year.
 (September 2013)

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916-2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. He is the author of several books, including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, and The Global Soul. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and other publications and his most recent book is The Man Within My Head.

Kenneth Koch (1925–2002) was Professor of English at Columbia. During his lifetime, Koch published at least thirty volumes of poetry and plays. He was also the author of a novel, The Red Robins; two books on teaching poetry writing to children, Wishes, Lies, and Dreams and Rose, Where Did You Get That Red?; and I Never Told Anybody: Teaching Poetry Writing in a Nursing Home.

John Lanchester is the author of five books including, most recently, I.O.U.: Why Everyone Owes Everyone and No One Can Pay. In 2008 he received the E.M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.
 (December 2011)

Robert Malley is Middle East and North Africa Program Director at the International Crisis Group. He is writing here in his personal capacity. (November 2012)

Jane Mayer is a staff writer for The New Yorker. The essay in this issue is based on her book The Dark Side: The Inside Story of How the War on Terror Turned into a War on American Ideals, which was published in July by Doubleday. (August 2008)

Colin McGinn is a philosopher whose books include The ­Character of Mind, The Problem of Consciousness, Consciousness and Its Objects, and The Meaning of Disgust.

 (April 2014)

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

Daniel Mendelsohn is the author of a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; the international best seller The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a translation of the works of C. P. Cavafy; and a previous collection of essays, How Beautiful It Is and How Easily It Can Be Broken. He teaches at Bard College.

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Benny Morris teaches history at Ben Gurion University in Beer Sheva and is the author of Righteous Victims: A History of the Zionist–Arab Conflict, 1881–2001. His most recent book, The Road to Jerusalem: Glubb Pasha, the Jews and Palestine, is being published in the UK this month. (June 2002)

Paul Muldoon is Howard G.B. Clark ‘21 Professor at Princea?ton and Poetry Editor of The New Yorker. His eleventh collection of poems, Maggot, will be published next year. (December 2009)

John Russell (1919–2008) was Chief Art Critic at The New York Times from 1982 until 1990. He was the author of many art-historical studies, including Matisse, Father & Son and The Meanings of Modern Art.

Alan Ryan’s collected essays The Making of Modern Liberalism and his two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought were published last year.

John R. Searle is Slusser Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley. His most recent book is Making the Social World.
 (January 2013)

Christopher de Bellaigue was born in London in 1971 and has worked as a journalist in the Middle East and South Asia since 1994. His first book, In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs: A Memoir of Iran, was shortlisted for the Royal Society of Literature’s Ondaatje Prize. His latest book is Patriot of Persia: Muhammad Mossadegh and a Tragic Anglo-American Coup. He lives in Tehran with his wife and two children.