Contents


Putin’s Trap

Violent Entrepreneurs: The Use of Force in the Making of Russian Capitalism by Vadim Volkov

Across the Moscow River: The World Turned Upside Down by Rodric Braithwaite

State and Evolution: Russia’s Search for a Free Market by Yegor Gaidar, translated from the Russian by Jane Ann Miller

The Goblin at War

Hitler Strikes Poland: Blitzkrieg, Ideology, and Atrocity by Alexander B. Rossino

Hitler’s Arctic War: The German Campaigns in Norway, Finland,and the USSR, 1940–1945 by Chris Mann and Christer Jörgensen

Hitler and His Generals: Military Conferences, 1942–1945 edited by Helmut Heiber and David M. Glantz, with an introduction by Gerhard L. Weinberg; translated from the German by Roland Winter, Krista Smith, and Mary Beth Friedrich

Murder in Karachi

A Mighty Heart: The Brave Life and Death of My Husband, Danny Pearl by Mariane Pearl, with Sarah Crichton

Who Killed Daniel Pearl? by Bernard-Henri Lévy, translated from the French by James X. Mitchell

Contributors

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.
 (April 2017)

Robert Cottrell is Editor of The Browser. He has served as a Moscow bureau chief for both The Economist and the Financial Times. (December 2016)

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

William Dalrymple’s books include The Last Mughal: The Fall of a Dynasty, Delhi 1857 and Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan, 1839–42. He is Codirector of the Jaipur Literature Festival.
 (November 2016)

Amos Elon (1926–2009) was an Israeli journalist. His final book was The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews In Germany 1743 – 1933.

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce, among other novels, and a memoir, Flyover Lives.
 (October 2017)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Daniel J. Kevles is Stanley Woodward Professor of History at Yale. His recent works include The Baltimore Case and he is currently completing a history of intellectual property in plants, animals, and people.


Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Darryl Pinckney’s most recent book is a novel, Black Deutschland. (November 2017)

Thomas Powers’s books include The Confirmation, a novel, and The Killing of Crazy Horse. (April 2017)

Alan Ryan’s On Tocqueville and On Marx were published last year. He is the author of the two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought: From Herodotus to the Present. He is visiting professor of philosophy at Stanford.


John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Michael Walzer is Professor Emeritus in the School of ­Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and co-­editor emeritus of Dissent. His new book, A Foreign Policy for the Left, will be published in the fall. (May 2017)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor Emeritus at Brown. His new book, Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, will be published in the fall.
 (May 2017)