Contents


Putin’s Trap

Violent Entrepreneurs: The Use of Force in the Making of Russian Capitalism by Vadim Volkov

Across the Moscow River: The World Turned Upside Down by Rodric Braithwaite

State and Evolution: Russia’s Search for a Free Market by Yegor Gaidar, translated from the Russian by Jane Ann Miller

The Goblin at War

Hitler Strikes Poland: Blitzkrieg, Ideology, and Atrocity by Alexander B. Rossino

Hitler’s Arctic War: The German Campaigns in Norway, Finland,and the USSR, 1940–1945 by Chris Mann and Christer Jörgensen

Hitler and His Generals: Military Conferences, 1942–1945 edited by Helmut Heiber and David M. Glantz, with an introduction by Gerhard L. Weinberg; translated from the German by Roland Winter, Krista Smith, and Mary Beth Friedrich

Murder in Karachi

A Mighty Heart: The Brave Life and Death of My Husband, Danny Pearl by Mariane Pearl, with Sarah Crichton

Who Killed Daniel Pearl? by Bernard-Henri Lévy, translated from the French by James X. Mitchell

Contributors

Daniel J. Kevles is Stanley Woodward Professor of History at Yale. His recent works include The Baltimore Case and he is currently completing a history of intellectual property in plants, animals, and people.


Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Darryl Pinckney, a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author of a novel, High Cotton, and Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature. He has worked for Robert Wilson on various theatrical projects, most recently an adaptation of Daniil Kharms’s The Old Woman.

Thomas Powers is the author of The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA (1979), Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the German Bomb (1993), Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda (2002; revised and expanded edition, 2004), and The Confirmation (2000), a novel. He won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1971 and has contributed to The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Nation, The Atlantic, and Rolling Stone. His latest book, The Killing of Crazy Horse, won the 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. He is currently writing a memoir of his father, who once told him that the last time he met Clare Boothe Luce was in the office of Allen Dulles.


Alan Ryan’s On Tocqueville and On Marx were published this summer. He is a Visiting Professor of Philosophy at Stanford this year.

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit: Angstrom, he two of which, Rabbit is Richand Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Michael Walzer is Professor Emeritus in the School of ­Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study and Co-editor Emeritus of Dissent magazine. He is the author most recently of In God’s Shadow: Politics in the Hebrew Bible. (March 2014)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown. His latest book is The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States.