Contents


The Don of Dons

When Hollywood Had a King: The Reign of Lew Wasserman, Who Leveraged Talent into Power and Influence Connie Bruck

Secret Geometry

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Man, the Image and the World with essays by Philippe Arbaïzar, Jean Clair, Claude Cookman, Robert Delpire, Peter Galassi, Jean-Noël Jeanneney, Jean Leymarie, and Serge Toubiana, and with translations from the French by Jane Brenton

Which Way to Mecca? Part II

Jihad: The Trail of Political Islam by Gilles Kepel

Militant Islam Reaches America by Daniel Pipes

The Two Faces of Islam: The House of Sa’ud from Tradition to Terror by Stephen Schwartz

Terror and Liberalism by Paul Berman

The Future of Political Islam by Graham E. Fuller

After Jihad: America and the Struggle for Islamic Democracy by Noah Feldman

Faithlines: Muslim Conceptions of Islam and Society by Riaz Hassan

The Ulama in Contemporary Islam: Custodians of Change by Muhammad Qasim Zaman

A Lost World

Forgotten Readers: Recovering the Lost History of African American Literary Societies by Elizabeth McHenry

Algeria’s Failed Revolution

La Sale Guerre by Habib Souaïdia

The Battlefield: Algeria, 1988–2002, Studies in a Broken Polity by Hugh Roberts

Double Blanc by Yasmina Khadra

Time for Reckoning: Enforced Disappearances in Algeria by The Human Rights Watch

Contributors

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of many novels, including The Book of Evidence, The Untouchable, Eclipse, The Sea (winner of the Man Booker Prize), and Ancient Light. As Benjamin Black he has written six crime novels, including Vengeance.

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Clifford Geertz (1926–2006) was an anthropologist. Widely recognized as the most influential American anthropologist of the twentieth century, Geertz championed the role of symbols in the creation and interpretation of social meaning. His many books include Peddlers and Princes: Social Development and Economic Change in Two Indonesian Towns and Available Light: Anthropological Reflections on Philosophical Topics.

Joseph Lelyveld is a former correspondent and editor of 
The New York Times. His latest book is Great Soul: Mahatma ­Gandhi and His Struggle with India. (December 2014)

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

Daniel Mendelsohn was born in 1960 and studied classics at the University of Virginia and at Princeton, where he received his doctorate. His essays and reviews appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review. His books include The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; and the collection Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture, published by New York Review Books. He teaches at Bard College. His essay in the September 25, 2014 issue will appear as the introduction to a new translation of The Bacchae by Robin Robertson, to be published in September by Ecco.

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His latest book is Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012.


Darryl Pinckney, a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author of a novel, High Cotton, and, in the Alain Locke Lecture Series, Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature. His new book is Blackballed: The Black Vote and US Democracy.


Max Rodenbeck is The Economist’s Middle East Bureau Chief. He lives in Cairo. (Septemer 2014)

Adam Shatz is a Contributing Editor at the London Review of Books and a former Literary Editor of The Nation. (January 2014)

Edward R. F. Sheehan is a former US diplomat in the Middle East, a novelist (Cardinal Galsworthy), and the author of The Arabs, the Israelis, and Kissinger. He is a former Fellow of Harvard’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. (April 2004)

Robert M. Solow, Institute Professor Emeritus of Economics at MIT, won the 1987 Nobel Prize in economics. His most recent book is Work and Welfare. (May 2009)