Contents


Gays and Genes

Reinventing the Male Homosexual: The Rhetoric and Power of the Gay Gene by Robert Alan Brookey

The World Turned: Essays on Gay History, Politics, and Culture by John D'Emilio

Normal: Transsexual CEOs, Crossdressing Cops, and Hermaphrodites with Attitude by Amy Bloom

Left Out: The Politics of Exclusion, Essays 1964–2002 by Martin Duberman

War and Its Consequences

The New Face of War by Bruce Berkowitz

The Mission: Waging War and Keeping Peace with America’s Military by Dana Priest

War Without End: The Rise of Islamist Terrorism and Global Response by Dilip Hiro

Iraq: In the Eye of the Storm by Dilip Hiro

Twin Peaks

Matisse Picasso Catalog of the exhibition by Elizabeth Cowling, John Golding, Anne Baldassari, Isabelle Monod-Fontaine, John Elderfield, and Kirk Varnedoe

The Case for Puccini

Puccini: A Biography by Mary Jane Phillips-Matz

Puccini: His Life and Works by Julian Budden

Puccini: His International Art by Michele Girardi, translated from the Italian by Laura Basini

Contributors

Hilton Als is a staff writer for The New Yorker. His first book, *The Women*, a meditation on gender, race, and personal identity, was published in 1996. He was awarded a Guggenheim for Creative Writing in 2000 and the George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism for 2002-03. Als lives in New York City.

Peter Dailey is a New York attorney and writer. For much of the Nineties he worked on Haitian human rights and political cases. (March 2003)

Timothy Ferris is Emeritus Professor of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. His latest book, The Science of Liberty: Democracy, Reason, and the Laws of Nature, was published in February. (March 2010)

Jack Flam is Distinguished Professor of Art History at Brooklyn College and at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His new book, Matisse and Picasso: The Story of Their Rivalry and Friendship, has just been published. (March 2003)

Caroline Fraser ‘s most recent book, Rewilding the World: Dispatches from the Conservation Revolution, was published in December. (May 2010)

Dana Goodyear is an editor at The New Yorker. (October 2003)

Philip Gossett is the Robert W. Reneker Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. His reconstruction of Gustavo III, the original version of Verdi’s Un ballo in maschera, had its première at the Göteborg Opera in Sweden this past September. (March 2003)

Andrew Hacker teaches political science at Queens College. He is currently working on a book on mathematics. 
 (January 2014)

Tim Judah writes about the Balkans for The Economist and its online column “Eastern Approaches.” (January 2014)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Aileen Kelly is a Fellow of King’s College, Cambridge. Her books include Toward Another Shore: Russian Thinkers Between Necessity and Chance.


Norman Mailer (1923-2007) was born in Long Branch, New Jersey, and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. In 1955 he co-founded The Village Voice. He is the author of more than thirty books, including The Naked and the Dead; The Armies of the Night, for which he won a National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize; The Executioner’s Song, for which he won his second Pulitzer Prize; Harlot’s Ghost; Oswald’s Tale; The Gospel According to the Son; and The Castle in the Forest.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Thomas Powers is the author of The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA (1979), Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the German Bomb (1993), Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda (2002; revised and expanded edition, 2004), and The Confirmation (2000), a novel. He won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1971 and has contributed to The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Nation, The Atlantic, and Rolling Stone. His latest book, The Killing of Crazy Horse, won the 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. He is currently writing a memoir of his father, who once told him that the last time he met Clare Boothe Luce was in the office of Allen Dulles.


John Russell (1919–2008) was Chief Art Critic at The New York Times from 1982 until 1990. He was the author of many art-historical studies, including Matisse, Father & Son and The Meanings of Modern Art.

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. (1917–2007) was an American historian and social critic. He served as adviser to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson. His Journals: 1952– 2000 were published in 2007.