Contents


Pioneer

The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan edited and with an introduction by Arturo Silva

The Inland Sea by Donald Richie, with an introduction by Pico Iyer

The Great Wave: Gilded Age Misfits, Japanese Eccentrics, and the Opening of Old Japan by Christopher Benfey

Animal Liberation at 30

Animal Rights and Wrongs by Roger Scruton

The Animal Question: Why Non-human Animals Deserve Human Rights by Paola Cavalieri, translated from the Italian by Catherine Woollard

Taking Animals Seriously: Mental Life and Moral Status by David DeGrazia

Dominion: The Power of Man, the Suffering of Animals, and the Call to Mercy by Matthew Scully

Talking All the Way

Winston Churchill by John Keegan

Churchill: Visionary. Statesman. Historian. by John Lukacs

In Churchill’s Shadow: Confronting the Past in Modern Britain by David Cannadine

Contributors

Al Alvarez is the author of Risky Business, a selection of essays, many of which first appeared in The New York Review of Books.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of many novels, including The Book of Evidence, The Untouchable, Eclipse, The Sea (winner of the Man Booker Prize), and Ancient Light. As Benjamin Black he has written six crime novels, including Vengeance.

Ian Buruma is currently the Paul R. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard College. His previous books include Year Zero: A History of 1945, Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance, Taming the Gods: Religion and Democracy on Three Continents, and Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of its Enemies. He writes frequently for The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, and the Financial Times. His new book is a collection of essays, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the Shadows of War, to be published in September 2014.

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Peter Dailey is a New York attorney and writer. For much of the Nineties he worked on Haitian human rights and political cases. (March 2003)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Arthur Goldhammer has translated more than a hundred books from the French. (October 2007)

Tim Judah is a correspondent for The Economist. For The New York Review he has reported from, among other places, Afghanistan, Serbia, Uganda, and Armenia.

Brady Kiesling was from 1983 until 2003 a career US diplomat, with service in Tel Aviv, Casablanca, Athens, and Yerevan, as well as three tours in the State Department. His letter of resignation to Secretary of State Colin Powell was published in the April 10 issue of The New York Review. (May 2003)

Bernard Knox (1914–2010) was an English classicist. He was the first director of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Among his many books are The Heroic Temper, The Oldest Dead White European Males, and Backing into the Future: The Classical Tradition and Its Renewal. He is the editor of The Norton Book of Classical Literature and wrote the introductions and notes for Robert Fagles’s translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Christopher Logue is the author of All Day Permanent Red: The First Battle Scenes of Homer’s Iliad Rewritten, of which the poem in this issue is a part. The new book, just published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, is the latest installment of War Music, an adaptation of the Iliad. His other works include several volumes of poetry, a pornographic novel, and a memoir, Prince Charming. (May 2003)

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. (1917–2007) was an American historian and social critic. He served as adviser to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson. His Journals: 1952– 2000 were published in 2007.

Peter Singer is the Ira W. Decamp Professor of Bioethics at Princeton University, and Laureate Professor at the University of Melbourne. He is the author of *Animal Liberation*, the editor of *In Defense of Animals: The Second Wav*, and, with Paola Cavalieri, co-editor of *The Great Ape Project*.

Jean Starobinski is Professor Emeritus of French literature at the University of Geneva. Blessings in Disguise and Largesse are among his works in English. A translation of his recent Action et réaction is to appear later this year. (May 2003)

Lorin Stein is Editor of The Paris Review. (December 2011)

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life. His article in this issue draws on his essay in Tyringham Topics.
 (February 2013)