Contents


Buried Between the Rivers

Art of the First Cities: The Third Millennium BC from the Mediterranean to the Indus Catalog of the exhibition edited by Joan Aruz with Ronald Wallenfels

Europe’s Apes and Us

Lowly Origin: Where, When and Why Our Ancestors First Stood Up by Jonathan Kingdon

The Speciation of Modern Homo sapiens edited by Tim Crow

The Journey of Man: A Genetic Odyssey by Spencer Wells

Our Thirsty Future

Water Wars: Drought, Flood, Folly, and the Politics of Thirst by Diane Raines Ward

Water Follies: Groundwater Pumping and the Fate of America’s Fresh Waters by Robert Glennon

Plan B: Rescuing a Planet Under Stressand a Civilization in Trouble by Lester R. Brown

The Fighter

D.H. Lawrence: A Biography by Jeffrey Meyers

The Letters of D.H. Lawrence: Volume 8 edited by James T. Boulton

The Cambridge Companion to D.H. Lawrence edited by Anne Fernihough

The Complete Critical Guide to D.H. Lawrence by Fiona Becket

Out of Sheer Rage: Wrestling with D.H. Lawrence by Geoff Dyer

Body of Truth: D.H. Lawrence: The Nomadic Years, 1919–1930 by Philip Callow

Living at the Edge: A Biography of D.H. Lawrence and Frieda von Richthofen by Michael Squires and Lynn K. Talbot

A Tale of Two Iliads

De l’Iliade by Rachel Bespaloff

On the Iliad by Rachel Bespaloff, translated from the Frenchby Mary McCarthy, with an introduction by Hermann Broch

Lettres à Jean Wahl, 1937–1947 by Rachel Bespaloff, edited by Monique Jutrin

The Iliad or The Poem of Force by Simone Weil, translated from the French by Mary McCarthy

Contributors

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author, most recently, of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.

 
(October 2014)

Jerome Bruner is University Professor at New York University. His newest book, Making Stories, appeared in the spring. (September 2003)

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications.

Lewis B. Cullman is a retired business owner and philanthropist who serves on many not-for-profit boards and is Chairman of Chess in the Schools. He is the author of Can’t Take It With You—The Art of Making and Giving Money.
 (September 2014)

William Dalrymple’s books include The Last Mughal: The Fall of a Dynasty, Delhi 1857 and Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan, 1839–42. He is codirector of the Jaipur Literature Festival.
 (October 2014)

Mark Danner is the author, most recently, of Stripping Bare the Body: Politics Violence War. He is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the ­Humanities at Bard. His writing and other work can be found at markdanner.com.

István Deák is Seth Low Professor Emeritus at Columbia. He is the author, with Jan Gross and Tony Judt, of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

Tim Flannery is a founding member of the Climate Council and 
former Chief Commissioner of the Australian Climate Commission. His most recent book is Among the Islands: Adventures in the Pacific. (August 2014)

Mark Ford’s Selected Poems will be published in April. He teaches in the English Department at University College London. (February 2014)

Edwin Frank is the editor of NYRB Classics.

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He currently leads the Free Speech Debate project at Oxford (freespeechdebate.com) and is writing a book about free speech.


John Golding (1929–2012) was a British painter and art historian. He taught at the Courtauld Institute and the Royal College of Art. Among his many books was Cubism: A History and an Analysis, which refuted the notion that Cubism represented a break with the realist tradition. Golding also curated exhibitions on both sides of the Atlantic, including Picasso: Painter/Sculpter and Matisse Picasso.

H. D. S. Greenway is the former editorial page editor of The Boston Globe, for which he writes a foreign affairs column. (September 2003)

Seamus Heaney’s first poetry collection, Death of a Naturalist, appeared forty years ago. Since then he has published poetry, criticism, and translations that have established him as one of the leading poets of his generation. In 1995 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Adrian Lyttelton is Professor of History at the Johns Hopkins University Center in Bologna and the author of The Seizure of Power: Fascism in Italy 1919–1929. (March 2006)

Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

Bill McKibben is Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, and the author of The End of Nature, Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future, Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet and of the forthcoming Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist. He is also the founder of 350.org, the global climate campaign that has been actively involved in the fight against natural gas fracking.

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

Fintan O’Toole is Literary Editor of The Irish Times and Leonard L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton. His latest book is A History of Ireland in 100 Objects. (December 2013)

Tim Parks is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan and the author of the travelogue Italian Ways. His latest novel is Sex Is Forbidden.


Timothy Potts is Director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. He is the author of Mesopotamia and the East.
 (September 2013)

Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He has published some twenty collections of poetry, six books of essays, a memoir, and numerous translations. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Simic’s recent works include Voice at 3 a.m., a selection of later and new poems; Master of Disguises, new poems; and Confessions of a Poet Laureate, a collection of short essays that was published by New York Review Books as an e-book original. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. His New and Selected Poems: 1962–2012 was published in March 2013. His article in this issue, August 14, 2014, was delivered as a talk at the Manggha Museum of ­Japanese Art and Technology in Kraków earlier this year, when he was presented with the Zbigniew Herbert International Literary Award.


Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown. His latest book is The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States.