Contents


Must Schools Fail?

No Excuses: Closing the Racial Gap in Learning by Abigail and Stephan Thernstrom

Black American Students in an Affluent Suburb: A Study of Academic Disengagement by John U. Ogbu, with Astrid Davis

Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life by Annette Lareau

Whitewashing Race: The Myth of a Color-Blind Society by Michael K. Brown and others

There Are No Shortcuts by Rafe Esquith

Final Test: The Battle for Adequacy in America’s Schools by Peter Schrag

City Schools and the American Dream: Reclaiming the Promise of Public Education by Pedro A. Noguera

The Ways of Genius

The Newtonian Moment: Science and the Making of Modern Culture

The Newtonian Moment: Isaac Newton and the Making of Modern Culture Catalog of the exhibition by Mordechai Feingold

For the Birds

Frogs by Aristophanes, adapted by Burt Shevelove and Nathan Lane, with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, and directed by Susan Stroman

Contributors

John Banville’s new novel, Mrs. Osmond, will be published in November. (November 2017)

Anita Desai is the author, most recently, of The Artist of Disappearance, a collection of three novellas. (October 2015)

Monica Ferrell is a recent Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford. (December 2004)

Orlando Figes is Professor of History at Birkbeck College, University of London. He is the author, most recently, of Revolutionary Russia, 1891–1991: A History.
 (May 2017)

Mark Ford’s latest book is Thomas Hardy: Half a Londoner. He teaches in the English Department at University College London. (October 2017)

Robert Gottlieb has been Editor in Chief of Simon and Schuster, Knopf, and The New Yorker. His most recent book is the memoir Avid Reader: A Life. (June 2017)

Anthony Grafton is Henry Putnam University Professor of History and the Humanities at Princeton University. His most recent book is The Culture of Correction in Renaissance Europe.


Anthony Hecht’sCollected Later Poems and Melodies Unheard: Essays on the Mysteries of Poetry were published in 2003. He died on October 20. (December 2004)

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

David Lodge is a novelist and critic and Emeritus Professor of English Literature at the University of Birmingham, England. His novels include Changing Places, Small World, Nice Work, and A Man of Parts. His most recent works of criticism are Consciousness and the Novel and The Year of Henry James.

Daniel Mendelsohn, a longtime contributor to The New York Review, teaches at Bard. His new memoir, An Odyssey: A ­Father, a Son, and an Epic, will be published in September.
 (April 2017)

Richard Rothstein is a research associate at the Economic Policy Institute and a visiting professor at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is the author of Class and Schools, published earlier this year. (December 2004)

Alan Ryan’s On Tocqueville and On Marx were published last year. He is the author of the two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought: From Herodotus to the Present. He is visiting professor of philosophy at Stanford.


Amartya Sen teaches economics and philosophy at Harvard. He was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1998. (June 2017)

Henry Siegman is President of the U.S./Middle East Project. He is a non-resident research professor at the Sir Joseph Hotung Middle East Program, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, a former Senior Fellow on the Middle East at the Council on Foreign Relations, and a former National Director of the American Jewish Congress.

Ronald Steel is Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern California, a recent fellow at the American Academy in Berlin, and the author of biographies of Walter Lippmann and Robert Kennedy.

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.