Contents


Good Pictures

Diane Arbus Revelations Catalog of the exhibition by Sandra S. Phillips, Elisabeth Sussman, Doon Arbus, Neil Selkirk, and Jeff L. Rosenheim

Diane Arbus: Family Albums Catalog of the exhibition by Anthony W. Lee and John Pultz

The Story of a Bubble

The Fabulous Decade: Macroeconomic Lessons from the 1990s by Alan S. Blinder and Janet L. Yellen

The Roaring Nineties: A New History of the World’s Most Prosperous Decade by Joseph E. Stiglitz

In the River of Consciousness

The Principles of Psychology by William James

Creative Evolution by Henri Bergson

The Organization of Behavior: A Neuropsychological Theory by Donald Hebb

Neural Darwinism: The Theory of Neuronal Group Selection by Gerald M. Edelman

Wider Than the Sky: The Phenomenal Gift of Consciousness by Gerald M. Edelman

The Physiology of Truth: Neuroscience and Human Knowledge by Jean-Pierre Changeux

The Astonishing Hypothesis: The Scientific Search for the Soul by Francis Crick

The Quest for Consciousness: A Neurobiological Approach by Christof Koch, foreword by Francis Crick.

A Natural History of Vision by Nicholas J. Wade

Contributors

Ian Buruma is currently the Paul R. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard College. His previous books include Year Zero: A History of 1945, Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance, Taming the Gods: Religion and Democracy on Three Continents, and Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of its Enemies. He writes frequently for The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, and the Financial Times. His new book is a collection of essays, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the Shadows of War, to be published in September 2014.

J. M. Coetzee’s novel The Childhood of Jesus was published in March 2013. He is Professor of Literature at the University of Adelaide and in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

John Gregory Dunne (1932–2003) was a novelist, screenwriter and critic. His final novel is entitled Nothing Lost.

Amos Elon (1926–2009) was an Israeli journalist. His final book was The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews In Germany 1743 – 1933.

Orlando Figes is Professor of History at Birkbeck College, University of London. He is the author, among other books, of The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin’s Russia, A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution: 1891–1924, and Natasha’s Dance: A Cultural History of Russia, and The Crimean War: A History. His latest book is Just Send Me Word: A True Story of Love and Survival in the Gulag and his next book, Revolutionary Russia, 1891–1991, will be published in April 2014.

Tim Judah is a correspondent for The Economist. For The New York Review he has reported from, among other places, Afghanistan, Serbia, Uganda, and Armenia.

John Lanchester is the author of five books including, most recently, I.O.U.: Why Everyone Owes Everyone and No One Can Pay. In 2008 he received the E.M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.
 (December 2011)

Janet Malcolm was born in Prague. She was educated at the High School of Music and Art, in New York, and at the University of Michigan. Along with In the Freud Archives, her books include Diana and Nikon: Essays on Photography, Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession, The Journalist and the Murderer, The Purloined Clinic: Selected Writings, The Silent Woman: Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, The Crime of Sheila McGough, and Reading Chekhov: A Critical Journey. She wrote about the trial of Mazoltuv Borukhova, the mother of Michelle, in her book Iphigenia in Forest Hills, just out in paperback. Her collection Forty-One False Starts: Essays on Artists and Writers will be published in the spring of 2013.


She lives in New York.

William D. Nordhaus is Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale. (March 2012)

Alastair Reid is a poet, a prose chronicler, a translator, and a traveler. Born in Scotland, he came to the United States in the early 1950s, began publishing his poems in The New Yorker in 1951, and for the next fifty-odd years was a traveling correspondent for that magazine. Having lived in both Spain and Latin America for long spells, he has been a constant translator of poetry from the Spanish language, in particular the work of Jorge Luis Borges and Pablo Neruda. He has published more than forty books, among them a wordbook for children, Ounce Dice Trice, with drawings by Ben Shahn. Most recently, in 2008, he published in the U.K. two career-spanning volumes, Outside In: Selected Prose and Inside Out: Selected Poetry and Translations. The substance of Supposing… e gleaned from the many children who have influenced him, to all of whom he owes and dedicates the text.

Robin Robertson is from the northeast coast of Scotland. His fifth collection of poetry will be published next year. (June 2012)

Oliver Sacks is a physician and the author of ten books, the most recent of which is Hallucinations. He is a professor of ­neurology at NYU School of Medicine and a visiting professor at the University of Warwick.


Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life. His article in this issue draws on his essay in Tyringham Topics.
 (February 2013)