Contents


Street Arab

Childe Hassam, American Impressionist Catalog of the exhibition edited by H. Barbara Weinberg

Out, Damned Blot!

What’s Wrong with the Rorschach?: Science Confronts the Controversial Inkblot Test by James M. Wood, M. Teresa Nezworski, Scott O. Lilienfeld, and Howard N. Garb

War Without End

How Israel Lost: The Four Questions by Richard Ben Cramer

Waging Peace: Israel and the Arabs, 1948–2003 by Itamar Rabinovich

The Unknown West

One Vast Winter Count: The Native American West Before Lewis and Clark by Colin G. Calloway

Before Lewis and Clark: The Story of the Chouteaus, the French Dynasty That Ruled America’s Frontier by Shirley Christian

The Murder of Lucy Pollard

A Murder in Virginia: Southern Justice on Trial by Suzanne Lebsock

Race Man: The Rise and Fall of the ‘Fighting Editor’ John Mitchell Jr. by Ann Field Alexander

Contributors

Stephen Kinzer, a former New York Times bureau chief in Nica­ragua, is a visiting fellow at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown. His new book is The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War. (December 2013)

Anthony Lewis, a former columnist for The New York Times, has twice won the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book is Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: A Biography of the First Amendment.

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

Daniel Mendelsohn was born in 1960 and studied classics at the University of Virginia and at Princeton, where he received his doctorate. His essays and reviews appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review. His books include The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; and the collection Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture, published by New York Review Books. He teaches at Bard College.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Simon Sebag Montefiore is a historian specializing in Russia. His book Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar won the History Book of the Year Prize in the British Book Awards. His Potemkin: Catherine the Great’s Imperial Partner, which was shortlisted for the British Samuel Johnson Prize, has just been published in paperback. (February 2005)

Ingrid D. Rowland is a professor, based in Rome, at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. A frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, she is the author of The Culture of the High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome and The Scarith of Scornello: A Tale of Renaissance Forgery. She has also published a translation of Vitruvius’ Ten Books of Architecture and a history of Villa Taverna, the US ambassador’s residence in Rome. Her new book is From Pompeii: The Afterlife of a Roman Town.


John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit: Angstrom, he two of which, Rabbit is Richand Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.