Contents


Filling the Hole

Imagining Ground Zero: Official and Unofficial Proposals for the World Trade Center Site by Suzanne Stephens with Ian Luna and Ron Broadhurst, and with a foreword by Robert A. Ivy

Sixteen Acres: Architecture and the Outrageous Struggle for the Future of Ground Zero by Philip Nobel

Up from Zero: Politics, Architecture, and the Rebuilding of New York by Paul Goldberger

Breaking Ground by Daniel Libeskind with Sarah Crichton

Seeing the Unseen

The Fly in the Cathedral: How a Group of Cambridge Scientists Won the International Race to Split the Atom by Brian Cathcart

A Sense of the Mysterious: Science and the Human Spirit by Alan Lightman

The Game’s Afoot

The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes, Volumes 1 and 2 by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, edited with a foreword and notes by Leslie S. Klinger, and with an introduction by John le Carré

Contributors

Michael Chabon is the author of several books, including The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Wonder Boys, The Amazing Adventures of Cavalier and Klay, The Yiddish Policeman’s Union, Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son and most recently, Telegraph Avenue.

Joseph Connors, the Director of the Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, Villa I Tatti, Florence, writes on Italian Renaissance and Baroque architecture. He was formerly Director of the American Academy in Rome and professor of art history at Columbia.

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Martin Filler’s latest book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II, has been long-listed for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Filler was born in 1948 and received degrees in art history from Columbia University. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and his writing on modern architecture has been published in more than thirty journals, magazines, and newspapers in the US, Europe, and Japan. His first collection of New York Review essays, Makers of Modern Architecture, was published in 2007. Filler is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife, the architectural historian Rosemarie Haag Bletter, live in New York and Southampton.

Benjamin Kunkel is the author of the novel Indecision and a founding editor of n+1 magazine.

Perry Link is Chancellorial Chair for Teaching Across Disciplines at the University of California at Riverside. He translated China’s Charter 08 manifesto, published in these pages, and recently 
co-edited No Enemies, No Hatred, a collection of essays and poems by Liu Xiaobo. His latest book isAn Anatomy of Chinese: Rhythm, Metaphor, Politics and he is finishing a translation of the autobiography of the Chinese dissident astrophysicist Fang Lizhi.

Simon Sebag Montefiore is a historian specializing in Russia. His book Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar won the History Book of the Year Prize in the British Book Awards. His Potemkin: Catherine the Great’s Imperial Partner, which was shortlisted for the British Samuel Johnson Prize, has just been published in paperback. (February 2005)

Darryl Pinckney, a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author of a novel, High Cotton, and, in the Alain Locke Lecture Series, Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature. His new book is Blackballed: The Black Vote and US Democracy.


Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. The Lunatic, his new volume of poetry, and The Life of Images, a book of his selected prose, will be published in the spring of 2015.


Robert Skidelsky is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at Warwick University, England. His latest book is How Much Is Enough?: Money and the Good Life with Edward Skidelsky. He is the author of a three-volume biography of John Maynard Keynes.
 (April 2014)

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life. His article in this issue draws on his essay in Tyringham Topics.
 (February 2013)

Michael Wood is the Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. His books include Literature and the Taste of Knowledge and Yeats and Violence

Christopher de Bellaigue was born in London in 1971 and has worked as a journalist in the Middle East and South Asia since 1994. His first book, In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs: A Memoir of Iran, was shortlisted for the Royal Society of Literature’s Ondaatje Prize. His latest book is Patriot of Persia: Muhammad Mossadegh and a Tragic Anglo-American Coup. He lives in Tehran with his wife and two children.