Contents


The New World Order

At the Point of a Gun: Democratic Dreams and Armed Intervention by David Rieff

The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War by Andrew J. Bacevich

A More Secure World: Our Shared Responsibility Report of the Secretary-General's High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change

Guantánamo and Beyond: The Continuing Pursuit of Unchecked Executive Power by Amnesty International

Small Wonder

Carel Fabritius 1622–1654 Young Master Painter

Carel Fabritius 1622–1654 by Frederik J. Duparc, with contributions by Gero Seelig and Ariane van Suchteren

The Great Heap of Days

Last Night by James Salter

Dusk and Other Stories by James Salter

Light Years by James Salter

Burning the Days: Recollection by James Salter

A Sport and a Pastime by James Salter

Solo Faces by James Salter

The Hunters by James Salter

Gods of Tin: The Flying Years by James Salter, edited and with an introduction by Jessica Benton and William Benton

Founders & Keepers

A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America by Stacy Schiff

John Adams: Party of One by James Grant

John Jay: Founding Father by Walter Stahr

The Long Trek to Freedom

Though the Heavens May Fall: The Landmark Trial That Led to the End of Human Slavery by Steven M. Wise

Slave Country: American Expansion and the Origins of the Deep South by Adam Rothman

The First Emancipator: The Forgotten Story of Robert Carter, the Founding Father Who Freed His Slaves by Andrew Levy

Bound for Canaan: The Underground Railroad and the War for the Soul of America by Fergus M. Bordewich

Contributors

Mark Danner is the author, most recently, of Stripping Bare the Body: Politics Violence War. He is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the ­Humanities at Bard. His writing and other work can be found at markdanner.com.

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

George M. Fredrickson is Edgar E. Robinson Professor of US History Emeritus at Stanford. His recent books include Racism: A Short History and Not Just Black and White, a collection co-edited with Nancy Foner.

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Arthur Kempton, the author of Boogaloo: The Quintessence of American Popular Music, is a fellow at the Institute for African-American Research at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (March 2006)

Anthony Lewis, a former columnist for The New York Times, has twice won the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book is Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: A Biography of the First Amendment.

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

Benjamin is the New Books columnist for Harper’s and the author of Why This World: A Biography of Clarice Lispector. He lives in the Netherlands. (June 2010)

Joyce Carol Oates is currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Writing Program at NYU. Her most recent novel is Carthage.

Tim Parks, a novelist, essayist, and translator, is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. He has recently published the novel Sex Is Forbidden and the travel book Italian Ways: On and Off the Rails from Milan to Palermo.


William Pfaff’s latest book is The Irony of Manifest Destiny: The Tragedy of America’s Foreign Policy.
 (June 2013)

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown. His latest book is The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States.

Christopher de Bellaigue was born in London in 1971 and has worked as a journalist in the Middle East and South Asia since 1994. His first book, In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs: A Memoir of Iran, was shortlisted for the Royal Society of Literature’s Ondaatje Prize. His latest book is Patriot of Persia: Muhammad Mossadegh and a Tragic Anglo-American Coup. He lives in Tehran with his wife and two children.